Background: This study aimed to investigate differences in adolescents’ social relationships with classmates of diverse gender, socioeconomic status, immigrant background, and academic achievement. Methods: A population of 10th-grade students (N = 406,783; males = 50.3%; Mage = 15.57 years, SDage = 0.75) completed the Classmates Social Isolation Questionnaire (CSIQ), an instrument specifically designed to measure two distinct but correlated types of peer relationships in class: peer acceptance and peer friendship. To obtain reliable comparisons across diverse adolescent characteristics, the measurement invariance of the CSIQ was established by means of CFAs and then latent mean differences tests were performed. Results: Immigrant background, academic achievement, and socioeconomic status all proved to be important factors influencing relationships with classmates, while being a male or a female was less relevant. Being a first-generation immigrant adolescent appears to be the foremost risk factor for being less accepted by classmates, while having a low academic achievement is the greatest hindrance for having friends in the group of classmates, a finding that diverges from previous studies. Conclusions: This population study suggests that adolescent characteristics (especially immigrant background, socioeconomic status, and academic achievement) seem to affect social relationships with classmates.

Adolescents’ Characteristics and Peer Relationships in Class: A Population Study / Cavicchiolo, Elisa; Lucidi, Fabio; Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Chirico, Andrea; Galli, Federica; Manganelli, Sara; D'Amico, Monica; Albarello, Flavia; Girelli, Laura; Cozzolino, Mauro; Sibilio, Maurizio; Zelli, Arnaldo; Mallia, Luca; Germani, Sara; Palombi, Tommaso; Fegatelli, Dario; Liparoti, Marianna; Mandolesi, Laura; Alivernini, Fabio. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - 19:15(2022), pp. 1-19. [10.3390/ijerph19158907]

Adolescents’ Characteristics and Peer Relationships in Class: A Population Study

Elisa Cavicchiolo
;
Fabio Lucidi;Andrea Chirico;Sara Manganelli;Monica D’Amico;Flavia Albarello;Laura Girelli;Mauro Cozzolino;Arnaldo Zelli;Luca Mallia;Sara Germani;Tommaso Palombi;Dario Fegatelli;Marianna Liparoti;Laura Mandolesi;Fabio Alivernini
2022

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate differences in adolescents’ social relationships with classmates of diverse gender, socioeconomic status, immigrant background, and academic achievement. Methods: A population of 10th-grade students (N = 406,783; males = 50.3%; Mage = 15.57 years, SDage = 0.75) completed the Classmates Social Isolation Questionnaire (CSIQ), an instrument specifically designed to measure two distinct but correlated types of peer relationships in class: peer acceptance and peer friendship. To obtain reliable comparisons across diverse adolescent characteristics, the measurement invariance of the CSIQ was established by means of CFAs and then latent mean differences tests were performed. Results: Immigrant background, academic achievement, and socioeconomic status all proved to be important factors influencing relationships with classmates, while being a male or a female was less relevant. Being a first-generation immigrant adolescent appears to be the foremost risk factor for being less accepted by classmates, while having a low academic achievement is the greatest hindrance for having friends in the group of classmates, a finding that diverges from previous studies. Conclusions: This population study suggests that adolescent characteristics (especially immigrant background, socioeconomic status, and academic achievement) seem to affect social relationships with classmates.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1658420
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