Entomophagy, or human consumption of insects, is differently entrenched in different areas of the world: it is common in Africa and Southeast Asia, where it has been practiced for centuries and consumed by 2 billion of people, but virtually unknown in Western countries. In Europe, the consumption of insects has only been allowed since 2015, when EU Regulation 2015/2283 recognized them as novel foods. Then, other regulations allowed products from four types of insects to be placed on the market: Tenebrio molitor larvae (dried, in snack form, and as a food ingredient), authorized by EU Regulation 882/2021; Locusta migratoria (frozen, dried, and powdered), authorized by EU Regulation 1975/2021; Acheta domesticus, authorized by EU Regulation 5/2023; and Alphitobius diaperinus larvae (frozen, paste, dried, and powdered), authorized by EU Regulation 58/2023. Although the nutritional composition depends on the type of insect, its growth stage, and its diet, all insects generally have high concentrations of protein and essential amino acids, unsaturated fatty acids, micronutrients (riboflavin, pantothenic acid, biotin, thiamin, vitamin B12, iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and selenium), and dietary fiber. Despite these nutritional properties, however, the inclusion of insects in the diet is a rather complex issue for European consumers, especially since they are unfamiliar with their national food culture. Therefore, it remains to be understood to what extent the European population could introduce such novel foods into their diet. In light of the above, the objective of this paper will be to conduct a literature overview to understand the acceptability of insects by the European population and thus what might be the main challenges and factors hindering their diffusion

Edible insects as a novel food choice. European challenges / Ruggeri, Marco; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Prencipe, Sabrina Antonia; Vinci, Giuliana. - (2023), pp. 28-36. (Intervento presentato al convegno Tokyo summit 7 - Tokyo 7th international innovative studies & contemporary scientific research congress tenutosi a Tokyo).

Edible insects as a novel food choice. European challenges

Marco Ruggeri;Fabrizio D'Ascenzo;Sabrina Antonia Prencipe;Giuliana Vinci
2023

Abstract

Entomophagy, or human consumption of insects, is differently entrenched in different areas of the world: it is common in Africa and Southeast Asia, where it has been practiced for centuries and consumed by 2 billion of people, but virtually unknown in Western countries. In Europe, the consumption of insects has only been allowed since 2015, when EU Regulation 2015/2283 recognized them as novel foods. Then, other regulations allowed products from four types of insects to be placed on the market: Tenebrio molitor larvae (dried, in snack form, and as a food ingredient), authorized by EU Regulation 882/2021; Locusta migratoria (frozen, dried, and powdered), authorized by EU Regulation 1975/2021; Acheta domesticus, authorized by EU Regulation 5/2023; and Alphitobius diaperinus larvae (frozen, paste, dried, and powdered), authorized by EU Regulation 58/2023. Although the nutritional composition depends on the type of insect, its growth stage, and its diet, all insects generally have high concentrations of protein and essential amino acids, unsaturated fatty acids, micronutrients (riboflavin, pantothenic acid, biotin, thiamin, vitamin B12, iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and selenium), and dietary fiber. Despite these nutritional properties, however, the inclusion of insects in the diet is a rather complex issue for European consumers, especially since they are unfamiliar with their national food culture. Therefore, it remains to be understood to what extent the European population could introduce such novel foods into their diet. In light of the above, the objective of this paper will be to conduct a literature overview to understand the acceptability of insects by the European population and thus what might be the main challenges and factors hindering their diffusion
2023
Tokyo summit 7 - Tokyo 7th international innovative studies & contemporary scientific research congress
Entomophagy, Novel foods, insects, European diet
04 Pubblicazione in atti di convegno::04b Atto di convegno in volume
Edible insects as a novel food choice. European challenges / Ruggeri, Marco; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Prencipe, Sabrina Antonia; Vinci, Giuliana. - (2023), pp. 28-36. (Intervento presentato al convegno Tokyo summit 7 - Tokyo 7th international innovative studies & contemporary scientific research congress tenutosi a Tokyo).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1683613
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