Since the 1940s, DDT has been widely used all over the world as insecticide for agricultural pests and in the management of mosquito-borne malaria (1, 2). Due to its environmental persistence and health and ecological problems related to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in ecosystems, DDT was banned in most industrialized countries since 1972 and by Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants in 2000 (1, 2). Despite of this, DDT is still detected in soil and water samples from several countries and long-term, toxic and cancerogenic effects of its occurrence still pose severe environmental risks to ecosystems and humans (2, 3). In the last decades, biodegradation of DDT by fungal species as environmentally friendly, feasible, integrated, cost-effective remediation methods has been investigated, as fungi possess metabolic and enzymatic versatility, leading them to tolerate and transform natural and anthropogenic substrates such as organic persistent pollutants (1, 2, 4). The study of soil microbial community represents an important step to shed further light on the environmental contest in order to select the best candidates for DDT biodegradation. In this research, we have isolated and identified 179 strains belonging to 59 saprotrophic soil fungal species (Ascomycota, Zygomycota and anamorphic fungi) occurring in samples from historically polluted agricultural soils of Poland with high concentrations of DDT. Some of them have been reported in literature for the biotransformation of DDT or other organic pollutants (2). Moreover, we have investigated the tolerance of selected fungal species to 1 mg/L DDT by using tolerance indices (Rt:Rc (%); T.I.(%)). Medium pH after fungal growth was measured and analysed with growth data (diametric extension and dry weight) to study metabolic responses to DDT. The results suggest that the tested fungal strains may provide future applications in environmental management and restoration.

Stress response and tolerance to DDT: soil fungal species isolated from polluted agricultural areas of Poland and their potential in fungal bioremediation / Ceci, Andrea; Russo, Fabiana; Malusà, Eligio; Maggi, Oriana; Persiani, Anna Maria. - STAMPA. - (2017), pp. 30-30. (Intervento presentato al convegno 112° Congresso della Società Botanica Italiana "IV International Plant Science Conference" tenutosi a Parma nel 20-23 Settembre 2017).

Stress response and tolerance to DDT: soil fungal species isolated from polluted agricultural areas of Poland and their potential in fungal bioremediation

CECI, ANDREA;RUSSO, FABIANA;MAGGI, Oriana;PERSIANI, Anna Maria
2017

Abstract

Since the 1940s, DDT has been widely used all over the world as insecticide for agricultural pests and in the management of mosquito-borne malaria (1, 2). Due to its environmental persistence and health and ecological problems related to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in ecosystems, DDT was banned in most industrialized countries since 1972 and by Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants in 2000 (1, 2). Despite of this, DDT is still detected in soil and water samples from several countries and long-term, toxic and cancerogenic effects of its occurrence still pose severe environmental risks to ecosystems and humans (2, 3). In the last decades, biodegradation of DDT by fungal species as environmentally friendly, feasible, integrated, cost-effective remediation methods has been investigated, as fungi possess metabolic and enzymatic versatility, leading them to tolerate and transform natural and anthropogenic substrates such as organic persistent pollutants (1, 2, 4). The study of soil microbial community represents an important step to shed further light on the environmental contest in order to select the best candidates for DDT biodegradation. In this research, we have isolated and identified 179 strains belonging to 59 saprotrophic soil fungal species (Ascomycota, Zygomycota and anamorphic fungi) occurring in samples from historically polluted agricultural soils of Poland with high concentrations of DDT. Some of them have been reported in literature for the biotransformation of DDT or other organic pollutants (2). Moreover, we have investigated the tolerance of selected fungal species to 1 mg/L DDT by using tolerance indices (Rt:Rc (%); T.I.(%)). Medium pH after fungal growth was measured and analysed with growth data (diametric extension and dry weight) to study metabolic responses to DDT. The results suggest that the tested fungal strains may provide future applications in environmental management and restoration.
2017
978-88-85915-21-3
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/974715
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