The cerebellum is involved in multiple closed-loops circuitry which connect the cerebellar modules with the motor cortex, prefrontal, temporal, and parietal cortical areas, and contribute to motor control, cognitive processes, emotional processing, and behavior. Among them, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway represents the anatomical substratum of cerebellum-motor cortex inhibition (CBI). However, the cerebellum is also connected with basal ganglia by disynaptic pathways, and cerebellar involvement in disorders commonly associated with basal ganglia dysfunction (e.g., Parkinson’s disease and dystonia) has been suggested. Lately, cerebellar activity has been targeted by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to indirectly affect and tune dysfunctional circuitry in the brain. Although the results are promising, several questions remain still unsolved. Here, a panel of experts from different specialties (neurophysiology, neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology) reviews the current results on cerebellar NIBS with the aim to derive the future steps and directions needed. We discuss the effects of TMS in the field of cerebellar neurophysiology, the potentials of cerebellar tDCS, the role of animal models in cerebellar NIBS applications, and the possible application of cerebellar NIBS in motor learning, stroke recovery, speech and language functions, neuropsychiatric and movement disorders.

Consensus Paper: Novel Directions and Next Steps of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation of the Cerebellum in Health and Disease / Manto, M.; Argyropoulos, G. P. D.; Bocci, T.; Celnik, P. A.; Corben, L. A.; Guidetti, M.; Koch, G.; Priori, A.; Rothwell, J. C.; Sadnicka, A.; Spampinato, D.; Ugawa, Y.; Wessel, M. J.; Ferrucci, R.. - In: THE CEREBELLUM. - ISSN 1473-4222. - 21:6(2022), pp. 1092-1122. [10.1007/s12311-021-01344-6]

Consensus Paper: Novel Directions and Next Steps of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation of the Cerebellum in Health and Disease

Koch G.;Priori A.;Spampinato D.;Ferrucci R.
2022

Abstract

The cerebellum is involved in multiple closed-loops circuitry which connect the cerebellar modules with the motor cortex, prefrontal, temporal, and parietal cortical areas, and contribute to motor control, cognitive processes, emotional processing, and behavior. Among them, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway represents the anatomical substratum of cerebellum-motor cortex inhibition (CBI). However, the cerebellum is also connected with basal ganglia by disynaptic pathways, and cerebellar involvement in disorders commonly associated with basal ganglia dysfunction (e.g., Parkinson’s disease and dystonia) has been suggested. Lately, cerebellar activity has been targeted by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to indirectly affect and tune dysfunctional circuitry in the brain. Although the results are promising, several questions remain still unsolved. Here, a panel of experts from different specialties (neurophysiology, neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology) reviews the current results on cerebellar NIBS with the aim to derive the future steps and directions needed. We discuss the effects of TMS in the field of cerebellar neurophysiology, the potentials of cerebellar tDCS, the role of animal models in cerebellar NIBS applications, and the possible application of cerebellar NIBS in motor learning, stroke recovery, speech and language functions, neuropsychiatric and movement disorders.
2022
Cerebellum; Neuromodulation; Non-invasive; tDCS; TMS
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Consensus Paper: Novel Directions and Next Steps of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation of the Cerebellum in Health and Disease / Manto, M.; Argyropoulos, G. P. D.; Bocci, T.; Celnik, P. A.; Corben, L. A.; Guidetti, M.; Koch, G.; Priori, A.; Rothwell, J. C.; Sadnicka, A.; Spampinato, D.; Ugawa, Y.; Wessel, M. J.; Ferrucci, R.. - In: THE CEREBELLUM. - ISSN 1473-4222. - 21:6(2022), pp. 1092-1122. [10.1007/s12311-021-01344-6]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1665523
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