Surface scatters provide a way to investigate hominin behaviors over broad spatial scales. However, the behavioral relevance of such assemblages is heavily dependent on the influence of the post-depositional processes. Continued development of geospatial technology and unmanned aerial systems (i.e. drones) provide new ways to better characterize and describe the role of geomorphic processes on the formation of surface assemblages. In this study, we examined the null hypothesis that the compositions of surface assemblages reflect modern geomorphological processes as opposed to hominin discard patterns. To do so, the formational history of lithic surface assemblages from the Koobi Fora Formation, Kenya were characterized using aerial photography, 3D photogrammetry, and GIS techniques. Subsequently, regression analysis was used to determine the correlation between variables such as artifact condition (i.e. preservation), scatter density, mass, and geomorphic surface characteristics such as slope and erosional potential for two localities from the Okote Member (FxJj 34 and FxJj 46). The lack of significant or strong correlations between artifact variables and present geomorphic conditions suggests that patterning in mapped distributions of stone artifacts reflects hominin discard behaviors rather than the outcome of hydrological processes. These assemblages have likely undergone some processes of winnowing and deflation of surrounding sediments. However, the horizontal association of these artifacts remains relatively undisturbed and therefore reflects past landscape scale behaviors.

in the process of publishing

Seminew Asrat
2017

Abstract

Surface scatters provide a way to investigate hominin behaviors over broad spatial scales. However, the behavioral relevance of such assemblages is heavily dependent on the influence of the post-depositional processes. Continued development of geospatial technology and unmanned aerial systems (i.e. drones) provide new ways to better characterize and describe the role of geomorphic processes on the formation of surface assemblages. In this study, we examined the null hypothesis that the compositions of surface assemblages reflect modern geomorphological processes as opposed to hominin discard patterns. To do so, the formational history of lithic surface assemblages from the Koobi Fora Formation, Kenya were characterized using aerial photography, 3D photogrammetry, and GIS techniques. Subsequently, regression analysis was used to determine the correlation between variables such as artifact condition (i.e. preservation), scatter density, mass, and geomorphic surface characteristics such as slope and erosional potential for two localities from the Okote Member (FxJj 34 and FxJj 46). The lack of significant or strong correlations between artifact variables and present geomorphic conditions suggests that patterning in mapped distributions of stone artifacts reflects hominin discard behaviors rather than the outcome of hydrological processes. These assemblages have likely undergone some processes of winnowing and deflation of surrounding sediments. However, the horizontal association of these artifacts remains relatively undisturbed and therefore reflects past landscape scale behaviors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1657208
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