Nowadays, atmospheric pollution is recognized as an important issue for environmental health. Due to the ongoing climate change, the recent international policies are devoted to keep under control and reduce the alarming increase in the emissions of hazardous organic and inorganic pollutants. Gaseous pollution can affect the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage as it can speed up chemical-physical-biological deterioration phenomena. Specifically, ozone (O3) is one of the major constituents of outdoor smog being a secondary pollutant of vehicular and industrial emissions. O3 is also indoor-generated by photocopiers, and electrical machinery (e.g., air cleaners and devices for disinfection during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic). Ozone is responsible for cumulative fading of dyes, colorants, and pigments; irreversible oxidation of organic compounds (e.g., paper, parchment, leather); embrittlement of fabrics, paint binders, and cellulosic materials. This contribution presents the results from a preliminary literature review on existing measurements of ozone collected in indoor conservation spaces (e.g., museums, archives, libraries, worship places). The research, performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta‐Analyses (PRISMA) procedure, led to the final inclusion of 44 documents extracted from Scopus and Web of Science, over the 1984-2021 period. Most studies were conducted in European museums and galleries located in urban areas and not equipped with filtering systems. O3 concentrations were measured in exhibition rooms (85%), storages (11%), and in cabinets/showcases (4%). Sampling instruments were heterogeneous and concentrations range between 0.1 and 125 ppb with a mean value of 13.8 ppb and a median value of 4.7 ppb. Although a growing scientific interest in indoor air quality, the review points out a shortage of references in international standards/guidelines on O3 monitoring procedures and on suggested O3 concentration limits in indoor conservation spaces.

Ozone monitoring in indoor conservation spaces: a preliminary review / Vergelli, Lisa; Bartolucci, Beatrice; Frasca, Francesca; Verticchio, Elena; Bertolin, Chiara; Siani, Anna Maria. - (2022). ((Intervento presentato al convegno VI International Congress "Chemistry for Cultural Heritage" (ChemCH 2022) tenutosi a Ravenna, Italy.

Ozone monitoring in indoor conservation spaces: a preliminary review

Lisa Vergelli;Beatrice Bartolucci;Francesca Frasca;Elena Verticchio;Anna Maria Siani
2022

Abstract

Nowadays, atmospheric pollution is recognized as an important issue for environmental health. Due to the ongoing climate change, the recent international policies are devoted to keep under control and reduce the alarming increase in the emissions of hazardous organic and inorganic pollutants. Gaseous pollution can affect the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage as it can speed up chemical-physical-biological deterioration phenomena. Specifically, ozone (O3) is one of the major constituents of outdoor smog being a secondary pollutant of vehicular and industrial emissions. O3 is also indoor-generated by photocopiers, and electrical machinery (e.g., air cleaners and devices for disinfection during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic). Ozone is responsible for cumulative fading of dyes, colorants, and pigments; irreversible oxidation of organic compounds (e.g., paper, parchment, leather); embrittlement of fabrics, paint binders, and cellulosic materials. This contribution presents the results from a preliminary literature review on existing measurements of ozone collected in indoor conservation spaces (e.g., museums, archives, libraries, worship places). The research, performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta‐Analyses (PRISMA) procedure, led to the final inclusion of 44 documents extracted from Scopus and Web of Science, over the 1984-2021 period. Most studies were conducted in European museums and galleries located in urban areas and not equipped with filtering systems. O3 concentrations were measured in exhibition rooms (85%), storages (11%), and in cabinets/showcases (4%). Sampling instruments were heterogeneous and concentrations range between 0.1 and 125 ppb with a mean value of 13.8 ppb and a median value of 4.7 ppb. Although a growing scientific interest in indoor air quality, the review points out a shortage of references in international standards/guidelines on O3 monitoring procedures and on suggested O3 concentration limits in indoor conservation spaces.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1655368
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