Objectives: Those responsible for interviewing immigrants in primary care settings often underestimate the importance of somatic symptoms arising from psychological distress. This study investigates the current prevalence of somatization in immigrants, and evaluates the comparative rates of somatic complaints in four ethnic groups (Caucasians, Asians, South/Center Americans, and Africans). Methods: We studied the 301 consecutive outpatients (aged between 16 and 70 years) attending the "Caritas" primary care unit for immigrants in Rome (Italy) from January to December 2003, all of whom completed the 21-item version of the Bradford Somatic Inventory (BSI-21). Patients scoring 14 or more on the BSI-21 were considered at risk for somatization. Results: The current prevalence of somatization was 35.2%; 62.3% of the somatizers were women. A multiple regression analysis adjusting for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, education, and months of stay in Italy showed that South/Central Americans had significantly higher somatization scores than the other three groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest a high probability of somatization syndromes in immigrant patients. South/Central Americans tend to somatize more than other ethnic groups. A psychosomatic approach may be useful for immigrants in primary care settings. © 2005, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.

Somatization in primary care. A comparative survey of immigrants from various ethnic groups in Rome, Italy / Aragona, M.; Tarsitani, L.; Colosimo, F.; Martinelli, B.; Raad, H.; Maisano, B.; Geraci, S.. - In: THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY IN MEDICINE. - ISSN 0091-2174. - 35:3(2005), pp. 241-248. [10.2190/2G8N-MNNE-PGGP-PJJQ]

Somatization in primary care. A comparative survey of immigrants from various ethnic groups in Rome, Italy

Aragona M.;Tarsitani L.
;
Geraci S.
2005

Abstract

Objectives: Those responsible for interviewing immigrants in primary care settings often underestimate the importance of somatic symptoms arising from psychological distress. This study investigates the current prevalence of somatization in immigrants, and evaluates the comparative rates of somatic complaints in four ethnic groups (Caucasians, Asians, South/Center Americans, and Africans). Methods: We studied the 301 consecutive outpatients (aged between 16 and 70 years) attending the "Caritas" primary care unit for immigrants in Rome (Italy) from January to December 2003, all of whom completed the 21-item version of the Bradford Somatic Inventory (BSI-21). Patients scoring 14 or more on the BSI-21 were considered at risk for somatization. Results: The current prevalence of somatization was 35.2%; 62.3% of the somatizers were women. A multiple regression analysis adjusting for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, education, and months of stay in Italy showed that South/Central Americans had significantly higher somatization scores than the other three groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest a high probability of somatization syndromes in immigrant patients. South/Central Americans tend to somatize more than other ethnic groups. A psychosomatic approach may be useful for immigrants in primary care settings. © 2005, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1620741
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