The adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with an individual care plan (ICP) is often not satisfactory, nor does it allow for a significant improvement in outcome, because of poor accessibility to services, poor integration of pathway articulations, poor reconciliation with the patient's life, or the lack of a constant reference person. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of community pharmacists and pharmacy services in improving adherence with periodic controls in DM2. The study was conducted at a rural pharmacy. A sample of 40 patients was calculated with respect to a historical cohort and subsequently enrolled. Clinical and personal data were collected in an electronic case report form. Pharmacists acting as a case manager followed patients carrying out their ICP developed by an attending physician. Some of the activities foreseen by the ICP, such as electrocardiogram, fundus examination, and self-analysis of blood and urine, were carried out directly in the pharmacy by the pharmacist through the use of telemedicine services and point of care units. Activities that could not be performed in the pharmacy were booked by the pharmacist at the accredited units. Examination results were electronically reported by the pharmacist to the attending physician. The primary endpoint was the variation in patient adherence with the ICP compared to a historical cohort. Secondary endpoints were variation in waiting time for the examinations, mean percentage change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and blood pressure, impact on healthcare-related costs, and perceived quality of care. Adherence to the ICP significantly increased. Waiting times were reduced and clinical outcomes improved with conceivable effects on costs. Patients appreciated the easier access to services. Community pharmacists and pharmacy services represent ideal actors and context that, integrated in the care network, can really favor ICP adherence and obtain daily morbidity reduction and cost savings through proper disease control and an early diagnosis of complications.

A new case manager for diabetic patients: a pilot observational study of the role of community pharmacists and pharmacy services in the case management of diabetic patients / La Regina, R.; Pandolfi, D.; Stabile, N.; Beloni, L.; Glisenti, F.; Griggio, P.; La Regina, M.; La Regina, G.. - In: PHARMACY. - ISSN 2226-4787. - 8:4(2020). [10.3390/pharmacy8040193]

A new case manager for diabetic patients: a pilot observational study of the role of community pharmacists and pharmacy services in the case management of diabetic patients

La Regina, G.
2020

Abstract

The adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with an individual care plan (ICP) is often not satisfactory, nor does it allow for a significant improvement in outcome, because of poor accessibility to services, poor integration of pathway articulations, poor reconciliation with the patient's life, or the lack of a constant reference person. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of community pharmacists and pharmacy services in improving adherence with periodic controls in DM2. The study was conducted at a rural pharmacy. A sample of 40 patients was calculated with respect to a historical cohort and subsequently enrolled. Clinical and personal data were collected in an electronic case report form. Pharmacists acting as a case manager followed patients carrying out their ICP developed by an attending physician. Some of the activities foreseen by the ICP, such as electrocardiogram, fundus examination, and self-analysis of blood and urine, were carried out directly in the pharmacy by the pharmacist through the use of telemedicine services and point of care units. Activities that could not be performed in the pharmacy were booked by the pharmacist at the accredited units. Examination results were electronically reported by the pharmacist to the attending physician. The primary endpoint was the variation in patient adherence with the ICP compared to a historical cohort. Secondary endpoints were variation in waiting time for the examinations, mean percentage change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and blood pressure, impact on healthcare-related costs, and perceived quality of care. Adherence to the ICP significantly increased. Waiting times were reduced and clinical outcomes improved with conceivable effects on costs. Patients appreciated the easier access to services. Community pharmacists and pharmacy services represent ideal actors and context that, integrated in the care network, can really favor ICP adherence and obtain daily morbidity reduction and cost savings through proper disease control and an early diagnosis of complications.
2020
case management; clinical pathway; community pharmacy; diabetes; health-system transformation; interprofessional care; interprofessional cooperation; pharmacist; pharmacy services; telemedicine
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
A new case manager for diabetic patients: a pilot observational study of the role of community pharmacists and pharmacy services in the case management of diabetic patients / La Regina, R.; Pandolfi, D.; Stabile, N.; Beloni, L.; Glisenti, F.; Griggio, P.; La Regina, M.; La Regina, G.. - In: PHARMACY. - ISSN 2226-4787. - 8:4(2020). [10.3390/pharmacy8040193]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1475583
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