To investigate the effects of oral bacteriotherapy on intestinal phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, in this longitudinal, double-arm trial, 15 virally suppressed HIV+ individuals underwent blood and fecal sample collection at baseline and after 6 months of oral bacteriotherapy. A baseline fecal sample was collected from 15 healthy individuals and served as control group for the baseline levels of fecal phenylalanine and tyrosine. CD4 and CD8 immune activation (CD38+) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Amino acid evaluation on fecal samples was conducted by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Results showed that HIV+ participants displayed higher baseline phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio values than healthy volunteers. A significand reduction in phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio and peripheral CD4+ CD38+ activation was observed at the end of oral bacteriotherapy. In conclusion, probiotics beneficially affect the immune activation of HIV+ individuals. Therefore, the restoration of intestinal amino acid metabolism could represent the mechanisms through which probiotics exert these desirable effects.

Modulation of phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism in HIV-1 infected patients with neurocognitive impairment: results from a clinical trial / Innocenti, Giuseppe P.; Santinelli, Letizia; Laghi, Luca; Borrazzo, Cristian; Pinacchio, Claudia; Fratino, Mariangela; Celani, Luigi; Cavallari, Eugenio N.; Scagnolari, Carolina; Frasca, Federica; Antonelli, Guido; Mastroianni, Claudio M.; d’Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo. - In: METABOLITES. - ISSN 2218-1989. - 10:7(2020). [10.3390/metabo10070274]

Modulation of phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism in HIV-1 infected patients with neurocognitive impairment: results from a clinical trial

Innocenti, Giuseppe P.
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Santinelli, Letizia
Secondo
Conceptualization
;
Borrazzo, Cristian
Data Curation
;
Pinacchio, Claudia
Data Curation
;
Fratino, Mariangela
Validation
;
Celani, Luigi
Investigation
;
Cavallari, Eugenio N.
Investigation
;
Scagnolari, Carolina
Project Administration
;
Frasca, Federica
Data Curation
;
Antonelli, Guido
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Mastroianni, Claudio M.
Supervision
;
d’Ettorre, Gabriella
Penultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Ceccarelli, Giancarlo
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2020

Abstract

To investigate the effects of oral bacteriotherapy on intestinal phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, in this longitudinal, double-arm trial, 15 virally suppressed HIV+ individuals underwent blood and fecal sample collection at baseline and after 6 months of oral bacteriotherapy. A baseline fecal sample was collected from 15 healthy individuals and served as control group for the baseline levels of fecal phenylalanine and tyrosine. CD4 and CD8 immune activation (CD38+) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Amino acid evaluation on fecal samples was conducted by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Results showed that HIV+ participants displayed higher baseline phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio values than healthy volunteers. A significand reduction in phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio and peripheral CD4+ CD38+ activation was observed at the end of oral bacteriotherapy. In conclusion, probiotics beneficially affect the immune activation of HIV+ individuals. Therefore, the restoration of intestinal amino acid metabolism could represent the mechanisms through which probiotics exert these desirable effects.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1463772
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