We contribute to the understanding of the relationship between organisational identification and work-related stress by examining the role that expanded forms of organisational identification play in explaining the nature of this relationship. The current study explores the extent to which organisational identification and other expanded forms of identification predict employee strain. We hypothesise that ambivalent identification, neutral identification, and disidentification will moderate the negative relationship between organisational identification and exhaustion and ego depletion, such that the link between identification and strain will be stronger when the other dimensions are low. We tested these predictions in a survey among 228 employees of care homes for the elderly (72% social-sanitary operators, 27% nurses). Results largely supported the hypotheses and show reliable interactions for ambivalent, neutral identification, and disidentification on both exhaustion and ego depletion. Results showed a significant moderation by ambivalent identification for exhaustion but not for ego depletion. We discuss limitations and future implications for research and practice of the expanded model of organisational identification in organisational interventions that deal with work-related stress.

Identity and stress: an application of the expanded model of organisational identification in predicting strain at work / Ciampa, V.; Steffens, N. K.; Schuh, S. C.; Fraccaroli, F.; van Dick, R.. - In: WORK AND STRESS. - ISSN 0267-8373. - 33:4(2019), pp. 351-365. [10.1080/02678373.2018.1521884]

Identity and stress: an application of the expanded model of organisational identification in predicting strain at work

Ciampa V.
Primo
;
2019

Abstract

We contribute to the understanding of the relationship between organisational identification and work-related stress by examining the role that expanded forms of organisational identification play in explaining the nature of this relationship. The current study explores the extent to which organisational identification and other expanded forms of identification predict employee strain. We hypothesise that ambivalent identification, neutral identification, and disidentification will moderate the negative relationship between organisational identification and exhaustion and ego depletion, such that the link between identification and strain will be stronger when the other dimensions are low. We tested these predictions in a survey among 228 employees of care homes for the elderly (72% social-sanitary operators, 27% nurses). Results largely supported the hypotheses and show reliable interactions for ambivalent, neutral identification, and disidentification on both exhaustion and ego depletion. Results showed a significant moderation by ambivalent identification for exhaustion but not for ego depletion. We discuss limitations and future implications for research and practice of the expanded model of organisational identification in organisational interventions that deal with work-related stress.
2019
ambivalent identification; disidentification; ego depletion; exhaustion; neutral identification; organisational identification
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Identity and stress: an application of the expanded model of organisational identification in predicting strain at work / Ciampa, V.; Steffens, N. K.; Schuh, S. C.; Fraccaroli, F.; van Dick, R.. - In: WORK AND STRESS. - ISSN 0267-8373. - 33:4(2019), pp. 351-365. [10.1080/02678373.2018.1521884]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1410536
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