Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis, and the severity may be influenced by the bacterial ecosystem. Our aim was to analyze the nasal microbiota from 48 infants affected by bronchiolitis from RSV virus and 28 infants with bronchiolitis but negative for the virus. Results showed a significantly lower biodiversity in the RSV-positive group with respect to the RSV-negative group, a specific microbial profile associated with the RSV-positive group different from that observed in the negative group, and significant modifications in the relative abundance of taxa in the RSV-positive group, as well as in the RSV-A group, with respect to the negative group. Furthermore, microbial network analyses evidenced, in all studied groups, the presence of two predominant sub-networks characterized by peculiar inter- and intra-group correlation patterns as well as a general loss of connectivity among microbes in the RSV-positive group, particularly in the RSV-A group. Our results indicated that infants with more severe bronchiolitis disease, caused by RSV-A infection, present significant perturbations of both the nasal microbiota structure and the microbial relationships. Patients with a milder bronchiolitis course (RSV-B-infected and patients who have cleared the virus) presented less severe alterations.

Nasal Microbiota in RSV Bronchiolitis / Schippa, Serena; Frassanito, Antonella; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Nenna, Raffaella; Petrarca, Laura; Neroni, Bruna; Bonfiglio, Giulia; Guerrieri, Francesca; Frasca, Federica; Oliveto, Giuseppe; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Midulla, Fabio. - In: MICROORGANISMS. - ISSN 2076-2607. - 8:5(2020), pp. 1-12. [10.3390/microorganisms8050731]

Nasal Microbiota in RSV Bronchiolitis

Schippa, Serena;Frassanito, Antonella;Marazzato, Massimiliano;Nenna, Raffaella;Petrarca, Laura;Neroni, Bruna;Bonfiglio, Giulia;Frasca, Federica;Oliveto, Giuseppe;Pierangeli, Alessandra;Midulla, Fabio
2020

Abstract

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis, and the severity may be influenced by the bacterial ecosystem. Our aim was to analyze the nasal microbiota from 48 infants affected by bronchiolitis from RSV virus and 28 infants with bronchiolitis but negative for the virus. Results showed a significantly lower biodiversity in the RSV-positive group with respect to the RSV-negative group, a specific microbial profile associated with the RSV-positive group different from that observed in the negative group, and significant modifications in the relative abundance of taxa in the RSV-positive group, as well as in the RSV-A group, with respect to the negative group. Furthermore, microbial network analyses evidenced, in all studied groups, the presence of two predominant sub-networks characterized by peculiar inter- and intra-group correlation patterns as well as a general loss of connectivity among microbes in the RSV-positive group, particularly in the RSV-A group. Our results indicated that infants with more severe bronchiolitis disease, caused by RSV-A infection, present significant perturbations of both the nasal microbiota structure and the microbial relationships. Patients with a milder bronchiolitis course (RSV-B-infected and patients who have cleared the virus) presented less severe alterations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1396352
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