BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients carry a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The excess of cardiovascular disease cannot be entirely explained by traditional risk factors and the immune system contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Moreover, post-translational modifications such as citrullination and carbamylation have been linked to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Anti-carbamylated proteins antibodies (anti-CarP) are a new subset of autoantibodies identified in RA patients. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between anti-CarP and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients. METHODS: We enrolled RA patients and normal healthy controls (NHS) without known cardiovascular risk factors or heart disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using the Modified Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation (mSCORE). Anti-CarP were investigated by a solid phase "home-made" ELISA. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF) were investigated by ELISA assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was evaluated by brachial artery Flow-Mediated Dilatation (FMD) and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (c-IMT) while arterial stiffness by Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI). RESULTS: We enrolled 50 RA patients (34 F and 16 M, mean age 58.4 ± 13.1 years, mean disease duration 127 ± 96.7 months) and 30 age and sex matched NHS. According to the mSCORE, 58% of patients had a low risk, 32% a moderate and 8% a high risk for cardiovascular disease. FMD was significantly lower in RA patients than in NHS (5.6 ± 3.2 vs 10.7 ± 8.1%; p < 0.004) and CAVIs significantly higher in a RA patients compared to NHS (left CAVI 8.9 ± 1.7 vs 8.1 ± 1.5; p < 0.04 for and right CAVI 8.8 ± 1.6 vs 8.0 ± 1.4; p < 0.04 for the). ABI and c-IMT did not differ between the two populations. The multivariate regression analysis showed a significant association of anti-CarP antibodies with FMD, left and right CAVI and both c-IMT (r = 1.6 and p = 0.05; r = 1.7 and p = 0.04; r = 2.9 and p = 0.05; r = 1.5 and p = 0.03; r = 1.1 and p = 0.03 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that RA patients, without evidence of cardiovascular disease or traditional risk factors, have an impaired endothelial function. Moreover, we found an association with anti-CarP antibodies suggesting a possible contribution of these autoantibodies to endothelial dysfunction, the earliest stage of atherosclerosis. Besides ultrasound assessment, anti-CarP should be assessed in RA patients and considered an additional cardiovascular risk factor.

Association between antibodies to carbamylated proteins and subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients / Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Pecani, Arbi; Ciciarello, Francesco Luigi; Colasanti, Tania; Di Franco, Manuela; Miranda, Francesca; Conti, Fabrizio; Valesini, Guido; Alessandri, Cristiano. - In: BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS. - ISSN 1471-2474. - ELETTRONICO. - 18:1(2017). [10.1186/s12891-017-1563-8]

Association between antibodies to carbamylated proteins and subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

SPINELLI, FRANCESCA ROMANA;PECANI, ARBI;CICIARELLO, Francesco Luigi;COLASANTI, TANIA;DI FRANCO, Manuela;MIRANDA, FRANCESCA;CONTI, FABRIZIO;VALESINI, Guido;ALESSANDRI, cristiano
2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients carry a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The excess of cardiovascular disease cannot be entirely explained by traditional risk factors and the immune system contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Moreover, post-translational modifications such as citrullination and carbamylation have been linked to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Anti-carbamylated proteins antibodies (anti-CarP) are a new subset of autoantibodies identified in RA patients. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between anti-CarP and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients. METHODS: We enrolled RA patients and normal healthy controls (NHS) without known cardiovascular risk factors or heart disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using the Modified Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation (mSCORE). Anti-CarP were investigated by a solid phase "home-made" ELISA. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF) were investigated by ELISA assays. Subclinical atherosclerosis was evaluated by brachial artery Flow-Mediated Dilatation (FMD) and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness (c-IMT) while arterial stiffness by Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI). RESULTS: We enrolled 50 RA patients (34 F and 16 M, mean age 58.4 ± 13.1 years, mean disease duration 127 ± 96.7 months) and 30 age and sex matched NHS. According to the mSCORE, 58% of patients had a low risk, 32% a moderate and 8% a high risk for cardiovascular disease. FMD was significantly lower in RA patients than in NHS (5.6 ± 3.2 vs 10.7 ± 8.1%; p < 0.004) and CAVIs significantly higher in a RA patients compared to NHS (left CAVI 8.9 ± 1.7 vs 8.1 ± 1.5; p < 0.04 for and right CAVI 8.8 ± 1.6 vs 8.0 ± 1.4; p < 0.04 for the). ABI and c-IMT did not differ between the two populations. The multivariate regression analysis showed a significant association of anti-CarP antibodies with FMD, left and right CAVI and both c-IMT (r = 1.6 and p = 0.05; r = 1.7 and p = 0.04; r = 2.9 and p = 0.05; r = 1.5 and p = 0.03; r = 1.1 and p = 0.03 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that RA patients, without evidence of cardiovascular disease or traditional risk factors, have an impaired endothelial function. Moreover, we found an association with anti-CarP antibodies suggesting a possible contribution of these autoantibodies to endothelial dysfunction, the earliest stage of atherosclerosis. Besides ultrasound assessment, anti-CarP should be assessed in RA patients and considered an additional cardiovascular risk factor.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/981387
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