The mechanisms by which drugs of abuse affect the accuracy of memory processes are not well understood. Here we tested the effects of the psychostimulants Amphetamine and the “bath salt” MDPV in an inhibitory avoidance discrimination task. Male SD rats (350-370 g) were trained and tested in different apparatuses. During training rats were placed into the light compartment of a first inhibitory avoidance (Non-Shock box) and they were allowed to cross to the dark compartment. Then, after a 1-min delay, they were placed into the light compartment of a second, contextually distinct, inhibitory avoidance apparatus (Shock box), and they received footshock upon entering the dark compartment. Amphetamine (1-3 mg/Kg), MDPV (0.5–1 mg/Kg) or saline were administered (i.p.) immediately after training. On the 48-h retention test, rats were tested, in a randomized order, in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes as well as in a Novel box. Controls had similar retention latencies in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes, indicating lack of discrimination. However, latencies in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes were longer than those in the Novel box, indicating that rats recognized the two training contexts. Amphetamine (3 mg/kg) increased retention latencies in the Shock box indicating an increase in memory strength. However, retention latencies in both safe environments were also increased, indicating an increased generalization. MDPV did not enhance memory, but it (1 mg/Kg) increased retention latencies in the Novel box, inducing generalization. Amphetamine and MDPV had differential effect on memory strength, but both drugs increased generalization of memory for emotional training. It is tentative to hypothesize that the different effects on memory strength versus generalization could be due to differences in the modulation of the monoaminergic neurotransmissions, in the recruitment of different brain areas or in the interaction with the stress response systems.

Amphetamine and the 'bath salt' MDPV enhance generalization of memory for emotional experiences in rats / Colucci, Paola; Mancini, Giulia F.; Santori, Alessia; Roozendaal, Benno; Campolongo, Patrizia. - STAMPA. - (2017). ((Intervento presentato al convegno Mediterranean Neuroscience Society (MNS) tenutosi a St Julian's, Malta.

Amphetamine and the 'bath salt' MDPV enhance generalization of memory for emotional experiences in rats

Colucci, Paola;Mancini, Giulia F.;Santori, Alessia;
2017

Abstract

The mechanisms by which drugs of abuse affect the accuracy of memory processes are not well understood. Here we tested the effects of the psychostimulants Amphetamine and the “bath salt” MDPV in an inhibitory avoidance discrimination task. Male SD rats (350-370 g) were trained and tested in different apparatuses. During training rats were placed into the light compartment of a first inhibitory avoidance (Non-Shock box) and they were allowed to cross to the dark compartment. Then, after a 1-min delay, they were placed into the light compartment of a second, contextually distinct, inhibitory avoidance apparatus (Shock box), and they received footshock upon entering the dark compartment. Amphetamine (1-3 mg/Kg), MDPV (0.5–1 mg/Kg) or saline were administered (i.p.) immediately after training. On the 48-h retention test, rats were tested, in a randomized order, in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes as well as in a Novel box. Controls had similar retention latencies in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes, indicating lack of discrimination. However, latencies in the Shock and Non-Shock boxes were longer than those in the Novel box, indicating that rats recognized the two training contexts. Amphetamine (3 mg/kg) increased retention latencies in the Shock box indicating an increase in memory strength. However, retention latencies in both safe environments were also increased, indicating an increased generalization. MDPV did not enhance memory, but it (1 mg/Kg) increased retention latencies in the Novel box, inducing generalization. Amphetamine and MDPV had differential effect on memory strength, but both drugs increased generalization of memory for emotional training. It is tentative to hypothesize that the different effects on memory strength versus generalization could be due to differences in the modulation of the monoaminergic neurotransmissions, in the recruitment of different brain areas or in the interaction with the stress response systems.
Mediterranean Neuroscience Society (MNS)
04 Pubblicazione in atti di convegno::04d Abstract in atti di convegno
Amphetamine and the 'bath salt' MDPV enhance generalization of memory for emotional experiences in rats / Colucci, Paola; Mancini, Giulia F.; Santori, Alessia; Roozendaal, Benno; Campolongo, Patrizia. - STAMPA. - (2017). ((Intervento presentato al convegno Mediterranean Neuroscience Society (MNS) tenutosi a St Julian's, Malta.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/952571
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