In keeping with the idea that observing objects activates possible motor responses, several experiments revealed compatibility effects between the hand postures used to report a choice and some characteristics of the stimuli. The real-time dynamics of such compatibility effects are currently unknown. We tracked the time course of a categorization experiment requiring subjects to categorize as natural or artifact figures of big and small objects. Participants reported their choice using either a big mouse (requiring a power grip: a hand posture compatible with the grasping of big objects) or a small mouse (requiring a precision grip: a hand posture compatible with the grasping of small objects). We found a compatibility effect between the grip required by the mouse and the grip elicited by objects, even if it was irrelevant to the task. In a following experiment with the same paradigm, lexical stimuli failed to reproduce the same effect. Nevertheless, a compatibility effect mediated by the target-word category (artificial vs. natural) was observed. We discuss the results in the context of affordance effects literature and grounded theories of cognition.

How do you hold your mouse? Tracking the compatibility effect between hand posture and stimulus size / Flumini, A; Barca, L; Borghi, ANNA MARIA; Pezzulo, G.. - In: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0340-0727. - STAMPA. - 79:6(2015), pp. 928-938. [10.1007/s00426-014-0622-0]

How do you hold your mouse? Tracking the compatibility effect between hand posture and stimulus size

BORGHI, ANNA MARIA;
2015

Abstract

In keeping with the idea that observing objects activates possible motor responses, several experiments revealed compatibility effects between the hand postures used to report a choice and some characteristics of the stimuli. The real-time dynamics of such compatibility effects are currently unknown. We tracked the time course of a categorization experiment requiring subjects to categorize as natural or artifact figures of big and small objects. Participants reported their choice using either a big mouse (requiring a power grip: a hand posture compatible with the grasping of big objects) or a small mouse (requiring a precision grip: a hand posture compatible with the grasping of small objects). We found a compatibility effect between the grip required by the mouse and the grip elicited by objects, even if it was irrelevant to the task. In a following experiment with the same paradigm, lexical stimuli failed to reproduce the same effect. Nevertheless, a compatibility effect mediated by the target-word category (artificial vs. natural) was observed. We discuss the results in the context of affordance effects literature and grounded theories of cognition.
2015
affordances; compatibility effects; grounded cognition; mouse tracking
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
How do you hold your mouse? Tracking the compatibility effect between hand posture and stimulus size / Flumini, A; Barca, L; Borghi, ANNA MARIA; Pezzulo, G.. - In: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0340-0727. - STAMPA. - 79:6(2015), pp. 928-938. [10.1007/s00426-014-0622-0]
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
flumini_How-do_2014_post-print.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Note: Articolo principale
Tipologia: Documento in Post-print (versione successiva alla peer review e accettata per la pubblicazione)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 651.96 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
651.96 kB Adobe PDF   Contatta l'autore
Flumini_How-Do_2015.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 986.31 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
986.31 kB Adobe PDF   Contatta l'autore

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/929290
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 20
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 16
social impact