Multiple non-ossifying fibromas (MNOFs) occur either isolated or in association with other anomalies, are usu- ally localized in the long bones of the lower limbs, may be radiographically confused with other skeletal lesions, and tend to heal spontaneously with the completion of the skeletal growth. Segmental distribution, either monomelic or polymelic and ipsilateral, is rare and commonly observed in the context of developmental diseases known as BRASopathies^, which are caused by mutations in genes that encode components or regulators within the Ras/mitogen- activated protein kinase signaling pathway. We describe here the radiographic and pathologic features of an 18-year-old Caucasian boy, whose clinical history started at the age of 3 when the diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst was made on a lytic lesion of his left clavicle. Over the following 2 years, the patient developed polyostotic and monomelic lesions within the left humerus, radius, and ulna. No other skeletal and extra- skeletal anomalies were clinically detected. The lesions were interpreted as consistent with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and MNOFs and showed an unusually aggressive clinical course with progressive increase in size and coalescence. The definitive diagnosis of MNOFs was made after the exclu- sion of fibrous dysplasia by molecular analysis. The polyostotic and monomelic distribution of the lesions and the unusually aggressive clinical course contribute to make this case of MNOFs unique.

A unique case of multiple non-ossifying fibromas with polyostotic monomelic distribution and aggressive clinical course / Corsi, Alessandro; Remoli, Cristina; Riminucci, Mara; Ippolito, Ernesto; Dimitriou, John. - In: SKELETAL RADIOLOGY. - ISSN 0364-2348. - 46:2(2017), pp. 233-236. [10.1007/s00256-016-2523-3]

A unique case of multiple non-ossifying fibromas with polyostotic monomelic distribution and aggressive clinical course.

CORSI, ALESSANDRO;REMOLI, CRISTINA;RIMINUCCI, MARA;
2017

Abstract

Multiple non-ossifying fibromas (MNOFs) occur either isolated or in association with other anomalies, are usu- ally localized in the long bones of the lower limbs, may be radiographically confused with other skeletal lesions, and tend to heal spontaneously with the completion of the skeletal growth. Segmental distribution, either monomelic or polymelic and ipsilateral, is rare and commonly observed in the context of developmental diseases known as BRASopathies^, which are caused by mutations in genes that encode components or regulators within the Ras/mitogen- activated protein kinase signaling pathway. We describe here the radiographic and pathologic features of an 18-year-old Caucasian boy, whose clinical history started at the age of 3 when the diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst was made on a lytic lesion of his left clavicle. Over the following 2 years, the patient developed polyostotic and monomelic lesions within the left humerus, radius, and ulna. No other skeletal and extra- skeletal anomalies were clinically detected. The lesions were interpreted as consistent with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and MNOFs and showed an unusually aggressive clinical course with progressive increase in size and coalescence. The definitive diagnosis of MNOFs was made after the exclu- sion of fibrous dysplasia by molecular analysis. The polyostotic and monomelic distribution of the lesions and the unusually aggressive clinical course contribute to make this case of MNOFs unique.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/928281
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