Background and objectives: A long research tradition has investigated the impact of stress on university students by assuming that individuals have a limited reservoir of resources, and that negative events and circumstances progressively drain resources thereby producing exhaustion. A recent research tradition, instead, has focused on the detrimental consequences of discrepant levels of implicit (ISE) and explicit (ESE) self-esteem on the development of stress-related symptoms. The present research attempted to merge the aforementioned approaches, with the aim of explaining significant predictors of stress. Design: Within the framework of a Longitudinal Structural Equation Model, we followed a moderated-mediated approach. Method: A sample of university students (N = 209; 66% females) completed a questionnaire battery including measures of ISE, ESE, perceptions of negative events, and emotional exhaustion. Participants were assessed once a week for eight consecutive weeks. Results: ISE significantly moderated the relationship between ESE and negative events; in turn, the latter significantly predicted emotional exhaustion. Monte Carlo simulations showed that negative events significantly mediated the relationship between incongruent self-esteem and emotional exhaustion. Conclusions: The detrimental role of incongruent self-esteem has been corroborated. Practical implications and suggestions for future research dealing with stress in a university setting were provided.

The costly burden of an inauthentic self: insecure self-esteem predisposes to emotional exhaustion by increasing reactivity to negative events / Alessandri, Guido; Perinelli, Enrico; DE LONGIS, Evelina; Rosa, Valentina; Theodorou, Annalisa; Borgogni, Laura. - In: ANXIETY, STRESS, AND COPING. - ISSN 1061-5806. - STAMPA. - 30:6(2017), pp. 630-646. [10.1080/10615806.2016.1262357]

The costly burden of an inauthentic self: insecure self-esteem predisposes to emotional exhaustion by increasing reactivity to negative events

ALESSANDRI, GUIDO;PERINELLI, ENRICO;DE LONGIS, EVELINA;Rosa, Valentina;THEODOROU, ANNALISA;BORGOGNI, Laura
2017

Abstract

Background and objectives: A long research tradition has investigated the impact of stress on university students by assuming that individuals have a limited reservoir of resources, and that negative events and circumstances progressively drain resources thereby producing exhaustion. A recent research tradition, instead, has focused on the detrimental consequences of discrepant levels of implicit (ISE) and explicit (ESE) self-esteem on the development of stress-related symptoms. The present research attempted to merge the aforementioned approaches, with the aim of explaining significant predictors of stress. Design: Within the framework of a Longitudinal Structural Equation Model, we followed a moderated-mediated approach. Method: A sample of university students (N = 209; 66% females) completed a questionnaire battery including measures of ISE, ESE, perceptions of negative events, and emotional exhaustion. Participants were assessed once a week for eight consecutive weeks. Results: ISE significantly moderated the relationship between ESE and negative events; in turn, the latter significantly predicted emotional exhaustion. Monte Carlo simulations showed that negative events significantly mediated the relationship between incongruent self-esteem and emotional exhaustion. Conclusions: The detrimental role of incongruent self-esteem has been corroborated. Practical implications and suggestions for future research dealing with stress in a university setting were provided.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/910554
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