Conservation actions need to be prioritized, often taking into account species' extinction risk. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List provides an accepted, objective framework for the assessment of extinction risk. Assessments based on data collected in the field are the best option, but the field data to base these on are often limited. Information collected through remote sensing can be used in place of field data to inform assessments. Forests are perhaps the best-studied land-cover type for use of remote-sensing data. Using an open-access 30-m resolution map of tree cover and its change between 2000 and 2012, we assessed the extent of forest cover and loss within the distributions of 11,186 forest-dependent amphibians, birds, and mammals worldwide. For 16 species, forest loss resulted in an elevated extinction risk under red-list criterion A, owing to inferred rapid population declines. This number increased to 23 when data-deficient species (i.e., those with insufficient information for evaluation) were included. Under red-list criterion B2, 484 species (855 when data-deficient species were included) were considered at elevated extinction risk, owing to restricted areas of occupancy resulting from little forest cover remaining within their ranges. The proportion of species of conservation concern would increase by 32.8% for amphibians, 15.1% for birds, and 24.7% for mammals if our suggested uplistings are accepted. Central America, the Northern Andes, Madagascar, the Eastern Arc forests in Africa, and the islands of Southeast Asia are hotspots for these species. Our results illustrate the utility of satellite imagery for global extinction-risk assessment and measurement of progress toward international environmental agreement targets.

Toward quantification of the impact of 21st-century deforestation on the extinction risk of terrestrial vertebrates / Łukasz, Tracewski; Stuart HM Butchart, ; DI MARCO, Moreno; Ficetola, Gentile F.; Rondinini, Carlo; Andy, Symes; Hannah, Wheatley; Beresford, Alison E.; Buchanan, Graeme M.. - In: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0888-8892. - STAMPA. - 30:5(2016), pp. 1070-1079. [10.1111/cobi.12715]

Toward quantification of the impact of 21st-century deforestation on the extinction risk of terrestrial vertebrates

Moreno Di Marco;RONDININI, CARLO;
2016

Abstract

Conservation actions need to be prioritized, often taking into account species' extinction risk. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List provides an accepted, objective framework for the assessment of extinction risk. Assessments based on data collected in the field are the best option, but the field data to base these on are often limited. Information collected through remote sensing can be used in place of field data to inform assessments. Forests are perhaps the best-studied land-cover type for use of remote-sensing data. Using an open-access 30-m resolution map of tree cover and its change between 2000 and 2012, we assessed the extent of forest cover and loss within the distributions of 11,186 forest-dependent amphibians, birds, and mammals worldwide. For 16 species, forest loss resulted in an elevated extinction risk under red-list criterion A, owing to inferred rapid population declines. This number increased to 23 when data-deficient species (i.e., those with insufficient information for evaluation) were included. Under red-list criterion B2, 484 species (855 when data-deficient species were included) were considered at elevated extinction risk, owing to restricted areas of occupancy resulting from little forest cover remaining within their ranges. The proportion of species of conservation concern would increase by 32.8% for amphibians, 15.1% for birds, and 24.7% for mammals if our suggested uplistings are accepted. Central America, the Northern Andes, Madagascar, the Eastern Arc forests in Africa, and the islands of Southeast Asia are hotspots for these species. Our results illustrate the utility of satellite imagery for global extinction-risk assessment and measurement of progress toward international environmental agreement targets.
2016
conservation prioritization; forest loss; habitat loss; IUCN Red List; remote sensing; species conservation
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Toward quantification of the impact of 21st-century deforestation on the extinction risk of terrestrial vertebrates / Łukasz, Tracewski; Stuart HM Butchart, ; DI MARCO, Moreno; Ficetola, Gentile F.; Rondinini, Carlo; Andy, Symes; Hannah, Wheatley; Beresford, Alison E.; Buchanan, Graeme M.. - In: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0888-8892. - STAMPA. - 30:5(2016), pp. 1070-1079. [10.1111/cobi.12715]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/893790
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