As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far.

As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 295-302, 2016.

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of phenotypic switch in gastrointestinal smooth muscle / Scirocco, Annunziata; Matarrese, P; Carabotti, Marilia; Ascione, B; Malorni, W; Severi, Carola. - In: JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0021-9541. - STAMPA. - 231:2(2016), pp. 295-302. [10.1002/jcp.25105]

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of phenotypic switch in gastrointestinal smooth muscle

SCIROCCO, ANNUNZIATA;CARABOTTI, MARILIA;SEVERI, Carola
2016

Abstract

As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far.
2016
As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 295-302, 2016.
cell protein; cytokine; microRNA; scleroprotein; transcription factor;
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Cellular and molecular mechanisms of phenotypic switch in gastrointestinal smooth muscle / Scirocco, Annunziata; Matarrese, P; Carabotti, Marilia; Ascione, B; Malorni, W; Severi, Carola. - In: JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0021-9541. - STAMPA. - 231:2(2016), pp. 295-302. [10.1002/jcp.25105]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/872329
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