Local contact behavior and its interaction with the global dynamics of the system are at the origin of innumerable contact issues concerning several different disciplines like tribology, geophysics, vibration mechanics or fracture mechanics. When two elastic media are in relative motion with a frictional interface, friction induced vibrations arise into the system. By a macroscopic point of view, the “macroscopic stick-slip” scenario occurring during relative motion is characterized by sudden friction force drops (sliding state) along the time, separated by periods of elastic energy accumulation (stick state). Instead, the mode dynamic instability occurs when a vibration mode of the mechanical system becomes unstable, due to frictional contact forces. This kind of instabilities, generated by frictional forces, have been mainly object of papers dealing with specific issues in different domains such as brake squeal, hip endoprosthesis squeaking, wheel-rail vibrations, earthquakes, etc. In this context, experimental and numerical analyses have been focused here on understanding how the local interface behavior affects the macroscopic frictional response of the system, and, conversely, during instability scenarios. The macroscopic frictional scenarios (macroscopic stick-slip instability, mode coupling instability, stable continuous sliding) arising between two simple elastic media in relative motion have been investigated numerically and experimentally. A newer experimental setup (TRIBOWAVE) has been developed and it allowed to reproduce and to investigate the different scenarios under well-controlled boundary conditions. The same frictional scenarios have been reproduced by transient numerical simulations. A dedicated friction law as a function of adherence (sticking) time has been recovered by means of experimental tests. The obtained friction law has been implemented in the numerical model, leading to a quantitative validation of the simulated scenarios by the experiments. Nonlinear transient simulations, complex eigenvalue analyses and experimental tests allowed for drawing instability maps as a function of system key parameters. The numerical model, validated by the comparison with the experimental global measurements (forces, accelerations/velocity), allowed for investigating the coupling between the local contact behavior (contact status distribution, wave and rupture propagation, precursors) and the system dynamic response during macroscopic stick-slip instability, mode coupling instability and stable continuous sliding. The understanding of the coupling between contact and system dynamics will bring to further improvements on the control of contact instabilities and related wear issues.

Macroscopic frictional contact scenarios and local contact dynamics: at the origins of “macroscopic stick-slip”, mode coupling instabilities and stable continuous sliding

TONAZZI, DAVIDE
2014-12-04

Abstract

Local contact behavior and its interaction with the global dynamics of the system are at the origin of innumerable contact issues concerning several different disciplines like tribology, geophysics, vibration mechanics or fracture mechanics. When two elastic media are in relative motion with a frictional interface, friction induced vibrations arise into the system. By a macroscopic point of view, the “macroscopic stick-slip” scenario occurring during relative motion is characterized by sudden friction force drops (sliding state) along the time, separated by periods of elastic energy accumulation (stick state). Instead, the mode dynamic instability occurs when a vibration mode of the mechanical system becomes unstable, due to frictional contact forces. This kind of instabilities, generated by frictional forces, have been mainly object of papers dealing with specific issues in different domains such as brake squeal, hip endoprosthesis squeaking, wheel-rail vibrations, earthquakes, etc. In this context, experimental and numerical analyses have been focused here on understanding how the local interface behavior affects the macroscopic frictional response of the system, and, conversely, during instability scenarios. The macroscopic frictional scenarios (macroscopic stick-slip instability, mode coupling instability, stable continuous sliding) arising between two simple elastic media in relative motion have been investigated numerically and experimentally. A newer experimental setup (TRIBOWAVE) has been developed and it allowed to reproduce and to investigate the different scenarios under well-controlled boundary conditions. The same frictional scenarios have been reproduced by transient numerical simulations. A dedicated friction law as a function of adherence (sticking) time has been recovered by means of experimental tests. The obtained friction law has been implemented in the numerical model, leading to a quantitative validation of the simulated scenarios by the experiments. Nonlinear transient simulations, complex eigenvalue analyses and experimental tests allowed for drawing instability maps as a function of system key parameters. The numerical model, validated by the comparison with the experimental global measurements (forces, accelerations/velocity), allowed for investigating the coupling between the local contact behavior (contact status distribution, wave and rupture propagation, precursors) and the system dynamic response during macroscopic stick-slip instability, mode coupling instability and stable continuous sliding. The understanding of the coupling between contact and system dynamics will bring to further improvements on the control of contact instabilities and related wear issues.
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Tesi dottorato Tonazzi

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 8.73 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
8.73 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri PDF

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/863973
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact