Diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia are main risk factors that promote the development of cardiovascular diseases. These metabolic abnormalities are frequently found to be associated together in a highly morbid clinical condition called metabolic syndrome. Metabolic derangements promote endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture, cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. This evidence strongly encourages the elucidation of the mechanisms through which obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome induce cellular abnormalities and dysfunction in order to discover new therapeutic targets and strategies for their prevention and treatment. Numerous studies employing both dietary and genetic animal models of obesity and diabetes have demonstrated that autophagy, an intracellular system for protein degradation, is impaired in the heart under these conditions. This suggests that autophagy reactivation may represent a future potential therapeutic intervention to reduce cardiac maladaptive alterations in patients with metabolic derangements. In fact, autophagy is a critical mechanism to preserve cellular homeostasis and survival. In addition, the physiological activation of autophagy protects the heart during stress, such as acute ischemia, starvation, chronic myocardial infarction, pressure overload, and proteotoxic stress. All these aspects will be discussed in our review article together with the potential ways to reactivate autophagy in the context of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.

Boosting autophagy in the diabetic heart: a translational perspective / Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Boppana, V. Subbarao; Umapathi, Mahaa; Frati, Giacomo; Sadoshima, Junichi. - In: CARDIOVASCULAR DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY. - ISSN 2223-3652. - 5:5(2015), pp. 394-402. [10.3978/j.issn.2223-3652.2015.07.02]

Boosting autophagy in the diabetic heart: a translational perspective

SCIARRETTA, SEBASTIANO;FRATI, GIACOMO;
2015

Abstract

Diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia are main risk factors that promote the development of cardiovascular diseases. These metabolic abnormalities are frequently found to be associated together in a highly morbid clinical condition called metabolic syndrome. Metabolic derangements promote endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture, cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. This evidence strongly encourages the elucidation of the mechanisms through which obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome induce cellular abnormalities and dysfunction in order to discover new therapeutic targets and strategies for their prevention and treatment. Numerous studies employing both dietary and genetic animal models of obesity and diabetes have demonstrated that autophagy, an intracellular system for protein degradation, is impaired in the heart under these conditions. This suggests that autophagy reactivation may represent a future potential therapeutic intervention to reduce cardiac maladaptive alterations in patients with metabolic derangements. In fact, autophagy is a critical mechanism to preserve cellular homeostasis and survival. In addition, the physiological activation of autophagy protects the heart during stress, such as acute ischemia, starvation, chronic myocardial infarction, pressure overload, and proteotoxic stress. All these aspects will be discussed in our review article together with the potential ways to reactivate autophagy in the context of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.
2015
Autophagy; diabetes; heart; metabolic syndrome; obesity
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Boosting autophagy in the diabetic heart: a translational perspective / Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Boppana, V. Subbarao; Umapathi, Mahaa; Frati, Giacomo; Sadoshima, Junichi. - In: CARDIOVASCULAR DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY. - ISSN 2223-3652. - 5:5(2015), pp. 394-402. [10.3978/j.issn.2223-3652.2015.07.02]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/837472
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