Current estimates of mobile data traffic in the years to come foresee a 1,000 increase of mobile data traffic in 2020 with respect to 2010, or, equivalently, a doubling of mobile data traffic every year. This unprecedented growth demands a significant increase of wireless network capacity. Even if the current evolution of fourth-generation (4G) systems and, in particular, the advancements of the long-term evolution (LTE) standardization process foresees a significant capacity improvement with respect to third-generation (3G) systems, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) has established a roadmap toward the fifth-generation (5G) system, with the aim of deploying a commercial system by the year 2020 [1]. The European Project named ?Mobile and Wireless Communications Enablers for the 2020 Information Society? (METIS), launched in 2012, represents one of the first international and large-scale research projects on fifth generation (5G) [2]. In parallel with this unparalleled growth of data traffic, our everyday life experience shows an increasing habit to run a plethora of applications specifically devised for mobile devices, (smartphones, tablets, laptops)for entertainment, health care, business, social networking, traveling, news, etc. However, the spectacular growth in wireless traffic generated by this lifestyle is not matched with a parallel improvement on mobile handsets? batteries, whose lifetime is not improving at the same pace [3]. This determines a widening gap between the energy required to run sophisticated applications and the energy available on the mobile handset. A possible way to overcome this obstacle is to enable the mobile devices, whenever possible and convenient, to offload their most energy-consuming tasks to nearby fixed servers. This strategy has been studied for a long time and is reported in the literature under different names, such as cyberforaging [4] or computation offloading [5], [6]. In recent years, a strong impulse to computation offloading has come through cloud computing (CC), which enables the users to utilize resources on demand. The resources made available by a cloud service provider are: 1) infrastructures, such as network devices, storage, servers, etc., 2) platforms, such as operating systems, offering an integrated environment for developing and testing custom applications, and 3) software, in the form of application programs. These three kinds of services are labeled, respectively, as infrastructure as a service, platform as a service, and software as a service. In particular, one of the key features of CC is virtualization, which makes it possible to run multiple operating systems and multiple applications over the same machine (or set of machines), while guaranteeing isolation and protection of the programs and their data. Through virtualization, the number of virtual machines (VMs) can scale on ?demand, thus improving the overall system computational efficiency. Mobile CC (MCC) is a specific case of CC where the user accesses the cloud services through a mobile handset [5]. The major limitations of today?s MCC are the energy consumption associated to the radio access and the latency experienced in reaching the cloud provider through a wide area network (WAN). Mobile users located at the edge of macrocellular networks are particularly disadvantaged in terms of power consumption and, furthermore, it is very difficult to control latency over a WAN. As pointed out in [7]?[9], humans are acutely sensitive to delay and jitter: as latency increases, interactive response suffers. Since the interaction times foreseen in 5G systems, in particular in the so-called tactile Internet [10], are quite small (in the order of milliseconds), a strict latency control must be somehow incorporated in near future MCC. Meeting this constraint requires a deep ?rethinking of the overall service chain, from the physical layer up to virtualization.

Communicating while computing: Distributed mobile cloud computing over 5G heterogeneous networks / Barbarossa, Sergio; Sardellitti, Stefania; DI LORENZO, Paolo. - In: IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING MAGAZINE. - ISSN 1053-5888. - 31:6(2014), pp. 45-55. [10.1109/msp.2014.2334709]

Communicating while computing: Distributed mobile cloud computing over 5G heterogeneous networks

BARBAROSSA, Sergio;SARDELLITTI, Stefania;DI LORENZO, PAOLO
2014

Abstract

Current estimates of mobile data traffic in the years to come foresee a 1,000 increase of mobile data traffic in 2020 with respect to 2010, or, equivalently, a doubling of mobile data traffic every year. This unprecedented growth demands a significant increase of wireless network capacity. Even if the current evolution of fourth-generation (4G) systems and, in particular, the advancements of the long-term evolution (LTE) standardization process foresees a significant capacity improvement with respect to third-generation (3G) systems, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) has established a roadmap toward the fifth-generation (5G) system, with the aim of deploying a commercial system by the year 2020 [1]. The European Project named ?Mobile and Wireless Communications Enablers for the 2020 Information Society? (METIS), launched in 2012, represents one of the first international and large-scale research projects on fifth generation (5G) [2]. In parallel with this unparalleled growth of data traffic, our everyday life experience shows an increasing habit to run a plethora of applications specifically devised for mobile devices, (smartphones, tablets, laptops)for entertainment, health care, business, social networking, traveling, news, etc. However, the spectacular growth in wireless traffic generated by this lifestyle is not matched with a parallel improvement on mobile handsets? batteries, whose lifetime is not improving at the same pace [3]. This determines a widening gap between the energy required to run sophisticated applications and the energy available on the mobile handset. A possible way to overcome this obstacle is to enable the mobile devices, whenever possible and convenient, to offload their most energy-consuming tasks to nearby fixed servers. This strategy has been studied for a long time and is reported in the literature under different names, such as cyberforaging [4] or computation offloading [5], [6]. In recent years, a strong impulse to computation offloading has come through cloud computing (CC), which enables the users to utilize resources on demand. The resources made available by a cloud service provider are: 1) infrastructures, such as network devices, storage, servers, etc., 2) platforms, such as operating systems, offering an integrated environment for developing and testing custom applications, and 3) software, in the form of application programs. These three kinds of services are labeled, respectively, as infrastructure as a service, platform as a service, and software as a service. In particular, one of the key features of CC is virtualization, which makes it possible to run multiple operating systems and multiple applications over the same machine (or set of machines), while guaranteeing isolation and protection of the programs and their data. Through virtualization, the number of virtual machines (VMs) can scale on ?demand, thus improving the overall system computational efficiency. Mobile CC (MCC) is a specific case of CC where the user accesses the cloud services through a mobile handset [5]. The major limitations of today?s MCC are the energy consumption associated to the radio access and the latency experienced in reaching the cloud provider through a wide area network (WAN). Mobile users located at the edge of macrocellular networks are particularly disadvantaged in terms of power consumption and, furthermore, it is very difficult to control latency over a WAN. As pointed out in [7]?[9], humans are acutely sensitive to delay and jitter: as latency increases, interactive response suffers. Since the interaction times foreseen in 5G systems, in particular in the so-called tactile Internet [10], are quite small (in the order of milliseconds), a strict latency control must be somehow incorporated in near future MCC. Meeting this constraint requires a deep ?rethinking of the overall service chain, from the physical layer up to virtualization.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/759399
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