In the last decades, the potential association between antidepressants and cancer risk has been increasingly investigated. Fundamental researches, performed on animal models and cell tumoral lines, have highlighted several biological mechanisms possibly supporting this association. Nevertheless, the epidemiological studies investigating the risk of cancer in patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have provided conflicting and inconclusive results. Therefore, the prescription of several antidepressants in oncologic patients still remains a matter of discussion. The aim of this review is to present and discuss available evidence concerning the association between the risk of breast and prostate cancer and the use of antidepressant medications. Thus, consistencies, differences, and contradictions of available data are reported. A special focus is addressed to amisulpiride, a widely prescribed drug still poorly investigated w

In the last decades, the potential association between antidepressants and cancer risk has been increasingly investigated. Fundamental researches, performed on animal models and cell tumoral lines, have high-lighted several biological mechanisms possibly supporting this association. Nevertheless, the epidemiological studies investigating the risk of cancer in patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRls) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have provided conflicting and inconclusive results. Therefore, the prescription of several antidepressants in oncologic patients still remains a matter of discussion. The aim of this review is to present and discuss available evidence concerning the association between the risk of breast and prostate cancer and the use of antidepressant medications. Thus, consistencies, differences, and contradictions of available data are reported. A special focus is addressed to amisulpiride, a widely prescribed drug still poorly investigated with regard to the risk of cancer occurrence and recurrence. Overall, there is no definitive evidence of increased risk of breast and prostate cancer among patients exposed to SSRIs and TCAs. The association between amisulpiride and cancer risk has been to date scarcely explored and considered in clinical settings. Nevertheless, the hyperprolactinemia frequently resulting from its adoption has been repeatedly associated, to increased cancer risk and poorer prognosis in cancer patients. Thus, the use of amisulpiride among cancer patients should be carefully considered. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Is amisulpride safe when prescribed to breast and prostate cancer patients? / Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Isabella; Calabro, F.; Roselli, Valentina; Hefner, S.; Biondi, Massimo. - In: MEDICAL HYPOTHESES. - ISSN 0306-9877. - ELETTRONICO. - 81:6(2013), pp. 1146-1150. [10.1016/j.mehy.2013.08.031]

Is amisulpride safe when prescribed to breast and prostate cancer patients?

Massimo Pasquini;Isabella Berardelli;Valentina Roselli;Massimo Biondi
2013

Abstract

In the last decades, the potential association between antidepressants and cancer risk has been increasingly investigated. Fundamental researches, performed on animal models and cell tumoral lines, have high-lighted several biological mechanisms possibly supporting this association. Nevertheless, the epidemiological studies investigating the risk of cancer in patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRls) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have provided conflicting and inconclusive results. Therefore, the prescription of several antidepressants in oncologic patients still remains a matter of discussion. The aim of this review is to present and discuss available evidence concerning the association between the risk of breast and prostate cancer and the use of antidepressant medications. Thus, consistencies, differences, and contradictions of available data are reported. A special focus is addressed to amisulpiride, a widely prescribed drug still poorly investigated with regard to the risk of cancer occurrence and recurrence. Overall, there is no definitive evidence of increased risk of breast and prostate cancer among patients exposed to SSRIs and TCAs. The association between amisulpiride and cancer risk has been to date scarcely explored and considered in clinical settings. Nevertheless, the hyperprolactinemia frequently resulting from its adoption has been repeatedly associated, to increased cancer risk and poorer prognosis in cancer patients. Thus, the use of amisulpiride among cancer patients should be carefully considered. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
In the last decades, the potential association between antidepressants and cancer risk has been increasingly investigated. Fundamental researches, performed on animal models and cell tumoral lines, have highlighted several biological mechanisms possibly supporting this association. Nevertheless, the epidemiological studies investigating the risk of cancer in patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have provided conflicting and inconclusive results. Therefore, the prescription of several antidepressants in oncologic patients still remains a matter of discussion. The aim of this review is to present and discuss available evidence concerning the association between the risk of breast and prostate cancer and the use of antidepressant medications. Thus, consistencies, differences, and contradictions of available data are reported. A special focus is addressed to amisulpiride, a widely prescribed drug still poorly investigated w
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/688097
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