Recent evidence suggests that somatic markers mediate decision-making processes by signalling potential rewards and punishments before conscious knowledge is available (Bechara et al. 2000, Cerebral Cortex, 295–307). The present study investigated whether anticipatory electrodermal responses to good and bad choices modulate choosing advantageously in a gambling task before explicit knowledge about the rules of the task is available. Forty-six under- graduates performed a computerized version of the gambling task while participants’ preferences toward the four decks of cards, their knowledge of the rules of the task (yes/no) and whether they could describe them as well as changes in electrodermal activity were measured. Participants were a-posteriori divided in two groups based on their knowledge of the rules by trial 100. Results of MANOVAs showed that by trial 50, participants in the "knowledge group" had made more advantageous choices (p 5 .043) and they had developed clear preferences toward the advantageous decks (pso.005). Anticipatory EDRs before making a choice varied significantly throughout the task between the two groups, F (4, 39) 5 2.40, p 5 .05. Between trials 21 and 41, participants in the ‘‘knowledge group’’ showed larger anticipatory EDRs before choosing disadvantageously as well as before choosing advantageously. The present results support the notion that positive and negative somatic markers modulate decision making by helping developing preferences before explicit knowledge is available.

Do positive and negative somatic markers precede good and bad choices before explicit knowledge is available? / Pecchinenda, Anna. - In: PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0048-5772. - STAMPA. - 40:(2003), pp. 67-67. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 43rd Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychophysiological-Research tenutosi a Chicago.

Do positive and negative somatic markers precede good and bad choices before explicit knowledge is available?

PECCHINENDA, ANNA
Primo
Conceptualization
2003

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that somatic markers mediate decision-making processes by signalling potential rewards and punishments before conscious knowledge is available (Bechara et al. 2000, Cerebral Cortex, 295–307). The present study investigated whether anticipatory electrodermal responses to good and bad choices modulate choosing advantageously in a gambling task before explicit knowledge about the rules of the task is available. Forty-six under- graduates performed a computerized version of the gambling task while participants’ preferences toward the four decks of cards, their knowledge of the rules of the task (yes/no) and whether they could describe them as well as changes in electrodermal activity were measured. Participants were a-posteriori divided in two groups based on their knowledge of the rules by trial 100. Results of MANOVAs showed that by trial 50, participants in the "knowledge group" had made more advantageous choices (p 5 .043) and they had developed clear preferences toward the advantageous decks (pso.005). Anticipatory EDRs before making a choice varied significantly throughout the task between the two groups, F (4, 39) 5 2.40, p 5 .05. Between trials 21 and 41, participants in the ‘‘knowledge group’’ showed larger anticipatory EDRs before choosing disadvantageously as well as before choosing advantageously. The present results support the notion that positive and negative somatic markers modulate decision making by helping developing preferences before explicit knowledge is available.
43rd Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychophysiological-Research
04 Pubblicazione in atti di convegno::04d Abstract in atti di convegno
Do positive and negative somatic markers precede good and bad choices before explicit knowledge is available? / Pecchinenda, Anna. - In: PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0048-5772. - STAMPA. - 40:(2003), pp. 67-67. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 43rd Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychophysiological-Research tenutosi a Chicago.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/637651
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