Despite the acknowledged influence of cognition on patients capacity to consent to treatment, the specific neuropsychological domains involved remain elusive, as does the role of executive functions. We investigated possible associations between executive functions and decisional capacity in a sample of acute psychiatric inpatients. Patients were recruited and evaluated through the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Patients with poor executive functioning performed worse in MacCAT understanding, appreciation, and expression of a choice, compared with good performers. These findings point to the importance of cognition in decisional capacity processes. In addition, the strong association found between learning abilities and informed consent decision-making provide empirical evidence indicating possible cognitive enhancement strategies that may improve psychiatric patients competency. © 2012 2012 by Joan Sieber.

The relationship between executive functions and capacity to consent to treatment in acute psychiatric hospitalization / Mandarelli, Gabriele; Parmigiani, Giovanna; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Frati, Paola; Biondi, Massimo; Ferracuti, Stefano. - In: JOURNAL OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH ON HUMAN RESEARCH ETHICS. - ISSN 1556-2646. - STAMPA. - 7:5(2012), pp. 63-70. [10.1525/jer.2012.7.5.63]

The relationship between executive functions and capacity to consent to treatment in acute psychiatric hospitalization

MANDARELLI, GABRIELE;PARMIGIANI, GIOVANNA;TARSITANI, LORENZO;FRATI, PAOLA;BIONDI, Massimo;FERRACUTI, Stefano
2012

Abstract

Despite the acknowledged influence of cognition on patients capacity to consent to treatment, the specific neuropsychological domains involved remain elusive, as does the role of executive functions. We investigated possible associations between executive functions and decisional capacity in a sample of acute psychiatric inpatients. Patients were recruited and evaluated through the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Patients with poor executive functioning performed worse in MacCAT understanding, appreciation, and expression of a choice, compared with good performers. These findings point to the importance of cognition in decisional capacity processes. In addition, the strong association found between learning abilities and informed consent decision-making provide empirical evidence indicating possible cognitive enhancement strategies that may improve psychiatric patients competency. © 2012 2012 by Joan Sieber.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/511725
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