In team-based organizations, team members may share similar experiences, feelings and, consequently, susceptibility to burnout. This study explores the burnout process beyond the individual level of analysis and integrates Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) with the Job Demands-Resources Model (JD-R), emphasizing the role of self-efficacy in shaping the meaning that people ascribe to situations. A multilevel structural equation model was tested in which it was predicted that work self-efficacy beliefs would be associated with burnout both directly and indirectly via job demands and job resources, and at both the individual and the team level. Moreover, it was posited that, at the team level, registered sickness absences are predicted by burnout. A sample of 5406 call centre operators, clustered in 186 teams working in the same large Italian company, filled out a questionnaire, whereas team absence rates were provided by the company's HR department. The findings largely supported the hypothesized model: at both levels, job demands and job resources partially mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and burnout. Moreover, at the team level, burnout predicted subsequent sickness absenteeism. In addition, individual-level burnout was primarily associated with job demands, whereas team-level burnout was primarily associated with a lack of team-level resources. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Does self-efficacy matter for burnout and sickness absenteeism? The mediating role of demands and resources at the individual and team levels / Consiglio, Chiara; Borgogni, Laura; Alessandri, Guido; Wilmar B., Schaufeli. - In: WORK AND STRESS. - ISSN 0267-8373. - STAMPA. - 27:1(2013), pp. 22-42. [10.1080/02678373.2013.769325]

Does self-efficacy matter for burnout and sickness absenteeism? The mediating role of demands and resources at the individual and team levels

CONSIGLIO, CHIARA;BORGOGNI, Laura;ALESSANDRI, GUIDO;
2013

Abstract

In team-based organizations, team members may share similar experiences, feelings and, consequently, susceptibility to burnout. This study explores the burnout process beyond the individual level of analysis and integrates Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) with the Job Demands-Resources Model (JD-R), emphasizing the role of self-efficacy in shaping the meaning that people ascribe to situations. A multilevel structural equation model was tested in which it was predicted that work self-efficacy beliefs would be associated with burnout both directly and indirectly via job demands and job resources, and at both the individual and the team level. Moreover, it was posited that, at the team level, registered sickness absences are predicted by burnout. A sample of 5406 call centre operators, clustered in 186 teams working in the same large Italian company, filled out a questionnaire, whereas team absence rates were provided by the company's HR department. The findings largely supported the hypothesized model: at both levels, job demands and job resources partially mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and burnout. Moreover, at the team level, burnout predicted subsequent sickness absenteeism. In addition, individual-level burnout was primarily associated with job demands, whereas team-level burnout was primarily associated with a lack of team-level resources. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
2013
work-related stress; teams; self-efficacy; call centre; sickness absenteeism; burnout; individual and team level
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Does self-efficacy matter for burnout and sickness absenteeism? The mediating role of demands and resources at the individual and team levels / Consiglio, Chiara; Borgogni, Laura; Alessandri, Guido; Wilmar B., Schaufeli. - In: WORK AND STRESS. - ISSN 0267-8373. - STAMPA. - 27:1(2013), pp. 22-42. [10.1080/02678373.2013.769325]
File allegati a questo prodotto
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/507451
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 94
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 81
social impact