BACKGROUND: Microelectronic DNA chip devices represent an emerging technology for genotyping. We developed methods for detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinically relevant genes. METHODS: Primer pairs, with one containing a 5'-biotin group, were used to PCR-amplify the region encompassing the SNP to be interrogated. After denaturation, the biotinylated strand was electronically targeted to discrete sites on streptavidin-coated gel pads surfaces by use of a Nanogen Molecular Workstation. Allele-specific dye-labeled oligonucleotide reporters were used for detection of wild-type and variant sequences. Methods were developed for SNPs in genes, including factor VII, beta-globin, and the RET protooncogene. We genotyped 331 samples for five DNA variations in the factor VII gene, >600 samples from patients with beta-thalassemia, and 15 samples for mutations within the RET protooncogene. All samples were previously typed by various methods, including DNA sequence analysis, allele-specific PCR, and/or restriction enzyme digestion of PCR products. RESULTS: Analysis of amplified DNA required 4-6 h. After mismatched DNA was removed, signal-to-noise ratios were >5. More than 940 samples were typed with the microelectronic array platform, and results were totally concordant with results obtained previously by other genotyping methods. CONCLUSIONS: The described protocols detect SNPs of clinical interest with results comparable to those of other genotyping methods.

Analysis of clinically relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms by use of microelectronic array technology / R., Santacroce; A., Ratti; F., Caroli; B., Foglieni; Alessandro, Ferraris; L., Cremonesi; M., Margaglione; M., Seri; R., Ravazzolo; G., Restagno; DALLA PICCOLA, Bruno; E., Rappaport; E. S., Pollak; S., Surrey; M., Ferrari; Fortina, Paolo. - In: CLINICAL CHEMISTRY. - ISSN 0009-9147. - STAMPA. - 48:12(2002), pp. 2124-2130.

Analysis of clinically relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms by use of microelectronic array technology

DALLA PICCOLA, Bruno;FORTINA, PAOLO
2002

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Microelectronic DNA chip devices represent an emerging technology for genotyping. We developed methods for detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinically relevant genes. METHODS: Primer pairs, with one containing a 5'-biotin group, were used to PCR-amplify the region encompassing the SNP to be interrogated. After denaturation, the biotinylated strand was electronically targeted to discrete sites on streptavidin-coated gel pads surfaces by use of a Nanogen Molecular Workstation. Allele-specific dye-labeled oligonucleotide reporters were used for detection of wild-type and variant sequences. Methods were developed for SNPs in genes, including factor VII, beta-globin, and the RET protooncogene. We genotyped 331 samples for five DNA variations in the factor VII gene, >600 samples from patients with beta-thalassemia, and 15 samples for mutations within the RET protooncogene. All samples were previously typed by various methods, including DNA sequence analysis, allele-specific PCR, and/or restriction enzyme digestion of PCR products. RESULTS: Analysis of amplified DNA required 4-6 h. After mismatched DNA was removed, signal-to-noise ratios were >5. More than 940 samples were typed with the microelectronic array platform, and results were totally concordant with results obtained previously by other genotyping methods. CONCLUSIONS: The described protocols detect SNPs of clinical interest with results comparable to those of other genotyping methods.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/475339
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