Background: There has been considerable effort expended on defining neurobehavioral characteristics of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Children with FASD display a range of cognitive deficits and behavioral problems. In this article, we report on the neurobehavioral characteristics of children with FASD in selected communities in Italy. It was expected that both inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive characteristics would discriminate children with FASD from controls and that the groups would also differ on intellectual functioning, language comprehension, and academic skills. Methods: Eighty-two children, 22 diagnosed with FASD and 60 control children, participated in this study. The children were administered tests of nonverbal reasoning, language comprehension, academic achievement, and behavior. Results: On tests of nonverbal reasoning and language comprehension, the FASD group earned lower scores than did controls. Moreover, on a test of academic achievement the FASD group scored lower. When comparing these 2 groups on disruptive behavioral symptomatology, similar results were obtained, the FASD group showing greater attentional difficulties and hyperactivity/impulsivity behaviors and more overall behavioral problems. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that a model containing inattention and error scores on the language comprehension task correctly classified 85% of the participants. Compared with the control group, a significantly greater proportion of children with FASD met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria of ADD, inattentive type, as reported by teachers. In contrast, hyperactive symptoms among children with FASD were comparable with the control group. Teachers rated children with FASD as having more inattentive behaviors and as performing lower in academic skills than controls. The association between reported hyperactivity symptoms and achievement scores was nonsignificant for both language and math scores, suggesting that it is not the hyperactivity causing problems, but the child's inattention. Conclusions: This research indicates that a nonclinic-referred sample of Italian children with FASD display a profile of neurobehavioral functioning consistent with that reported by other researchers. Furthermore, the neurobehavioral characteristic most identified with children diagnosed with FASD was inattention followed by hyperactivity.

Neurobehavioral characteristics of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in communities from Italy: Preliminary results / Piyadasa, Kodituwakku; Giovanna, Coriale; Daniela, Fiorentino; Alfredo S., Aragon; Wendy O., Kalberg; David, Buckley; J., Phillip Gossage; Ceccanti, Mauro; Philip A., May. - In: ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0145-6008. - STAMPA. - 30:9(2006), pp. 1551-1561. [10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00187.x]

Neurobehavioral characteristics of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in communities from Italy: Preliminary results

CECCANTI, Mauro;
2006

Abstract

Background: There has been considerable effort expended on defining neurobehavioral characteristics of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Children with FASD display a range of cognitive deficits and behavioral problems. In this article, we report on the neurobehavioral characteristics of children with FASD in selected communities in Italy. It was expected that both inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive characteristics would discriminate children with FASD from controls and that the groups would also differ on intellectual functioning, language comprehension, and academic skills. Methods: Eighty-two children, 22 diagnosed with FASD and 60 control children, participated in this study. The children were administered tests of nonverbal reasoning, language comprehension, academic achievement, and behavior. Results: On tests of nonverbal reasoning and language comprehension, the FASD group earned lower scores than did controls. Moreover, on a test of academic achievement the FASD group scored lower. When comparing these 2 groups on disruptive behavioral symptomatology, similar results were obtained, the FASD group showing greater attentional difficulties and hyperactivity/impulsivity behaviors and more overall behavioral problems. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that a model containing inattention and error scores on the language comprehension task correctly classified 85% of the participants. Compared with the control group, a significantly greater proportion of children with FASD met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria of ADD, inattentive type, as reported by teachers. In contrast, hyperactive symptoms among children with FASD were comparable with the control group. Teachers rated children with FASD as having more inattentive behaviors and as performing lower in academic skills than controls. The association between reported hyperactivity symptoms and achievement scores was nonsignificant for both language and math scores, suggesting that it is not the hyperactivity causing problems, but the child's inattention. Conclusions: This research indicates that a nonclinic-referred sample of Italian children with FASD display a profile of neurobehavioral functioning consistent with that reported by other researchers. Furthermore, the neurobehavioral characteristic most identified with children diagnosed with FASD was inattention followed by hyperactivity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/407824
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