The aim of this study is to investigate the effects in vitro induced by androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) (testosterone, nandrolone, androstenedione, norandrostenedione, and norandrostenediol) used illicitly in sport competitions, on the proliferation ability, apoptosis and the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), selected as a prototype of a biological target system whose structure and function can be affected by steroids. For this purpose, we evaluated the proliferation inhibition by cytotoxic assay expressed as the concentration of drug inducing a 50% decrease in growth (IC50). The IC50 was reached for testosterone at 100 mu M, androstenedione at 375 mu M, nandrolone at 9 mu M, norandrostenedione at 500 mu M. The IC50 value for norandrostenediol was not reached until a concentration of 6000 mu M. The apoptotic effect was evaluated by flow cytometry at IC50 for each drug. We observed that testosterone induced 31% of apoptotic cells, norandrostenedione 25%, androstenedione 15% and nandrolone 18%. We have analyzed the effects of these drugs on [Ca2+], both in the immediate and long-term continuous presence of each compound. Our data show a statistically significant increase of [Ca2+](i) in the acute condition and in long-term treated cultures, suggesting that androgen steroids modulate intracellular levels of calcium independent of incubation time or compound identity. As a whole, this study demonstrates that AAS might alter endothelial homeostasis, predisposing to the early endothelial cell activation that is responsible for vascular complications observed frequently in AAS users. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Detrimental effects of anabolic steroids on human endothelial cells / Sandra, D'Ascenzo; Danilo, Millimaggi; Caterina Di, Massimo; Gloria Saccani, Jotti; Botre', Francesco; Gaspare, Carta; Maria Giuliana Tozzi, Ciancarelli; Pavan, Antonio; Vincenza, Dolo. - In: TOXICOLOGY LETTERS. - ISSN 0378-4274. - STAMPA. - 169:2(2007), pp. 129-136. [10.1016/j.toxlet.2006.12.008]

Detrimental effects of anabolic steroids on human endothelial cells

BOTRE', Francesco;PAVAN, Antonio;
2007

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the effects in vitro induced by androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) (testosterone, nandrolone, androstenedione, norandrostenedione, and norandrostenediol) used illicitly in sport competitions, on the proliferation ability, apoptosis and the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), selected as a prototype of a biological target system whose structure and function can be affected by steroids. For this purpose, we evaluated the proliferation inhibition by cytotoxic assay expressed as the concentration of drug inducing a 50% decrease in growth (IC50). The IC50 was reached for testosterone at 100 mu M, androstenedione at 375 mu M, nandrolone at 9 mu M, norandrostenedione at 500 mu M. The IC50 value for norandrostenediol was not reached until a concentration of 6000 mu M. The apoptotic effect was evaluated by flow cytometry at IC50 for each drug. We observed that testosterone induced 31% of apoptotic cells, norandrostenedione 25%, androstenedione 15% and nandrolone 18%. We have analyzed the effects of these drugs on [Ca2+], both in the immediate and long-term continuous presence of each compound. Our data show a statistically significant increase of [Ca2+](i) in the acute condition and in long-term treated cultures, suggesting that androgen steroids modulate intracellular levels of calcium independent of incubation time or compound identity. As a whole, this study demonstrates that AAS might alter endothelial homeostasis, predisposing to the early endothelial cell activation that is responsible for vascular complications observed frequently in AAS users. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
File allegati a questo prodotto
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/402538
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 12
  • Scopus 39
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 31
social impact