Introduction. Two opposing views of the human body have existed since time began. Can it be traded or does its value go beyond a monetary one? Today it is illegal to sell organs but the success of organ transplantation has give rise to an enormous controversy. The continued increase in the need for organs has lead to a major use of live donors. Consequently, clandestine selling of organs is becoming more widespread for two main reasons: scientific progress and market demand. Our aim was to consider the protection of ethical principles through legislation. Materials and methods. Based on the principle that it is morally unacceptable for people to die on a waiting list, we analysed various ways in which the National Health Service could give incentives to live donors, including reimbursement of health expenses, tax relief, pension or early retirement benefits, or education grants for the children. Possible incentives for cadaveric organ donation included reimbursal of health and funeral costs, or increase in widow/er's pension. Conclusion. The tendency may be toward reimbursement of costs rather than actual payments. A legal, ethical organ market could save thousands of human lives, but it must be correctly regulated.

Is legalizing the organ market possible? / Novelli, Gilnardo; Rossi, Massimo; Poli, Luca; Morabito, VINCENZO EMILIANO; Ferretti, Stefano; Bussotti, Alessandro; Nudo, Francesco; Mennini, Gianluca; F., Antonellis; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo. - In: TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS. - ISSN 0041-1345. - STAMPA. - 39:6(2007), pp. 1743-1745. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 30th Congress of the Italian-Society-of-Organ-Transplantation tenutosi a Padova, ITALY nel NOV 30-DEC 02, 2006 [10.1016/j.transproceed.2007.05.075].

Is legalizing the organ market possible?

NOVELLI, Gilnardo;ROSSI, MASSIMO;POLI, Luca;MORABITO, VINCENZO EMILIANO;FERRETTI, Stefano;BUSSOTTI, Alessandro;NUDO, FRANCESCO;MENNINI, Gianluca;BERLOCO, Pasquale Bartolomeo
2007

Abstract

Introduction. Two opposing views of the human body have existed since time began. Can it be traded or does its value go beyond a monetary one? Today it is illegal to sell organs but the success of organ transplantation has give rise to an enormous controversy. The continued increase in the need for organs has lead to a major use of live donors. Consequently, clandestine selling of organs is becoming more widespread for two main reasons: scientific progress and market demand. Our aim was to consider the protection of ethical principles through legislation. Materials and methods. Based on the principle that it is morally unacceptable for people to die on a waiting list, we analysed various ways in which the National Health Service could give incentives to live donors, including reimbursement of health expenses, tax relief, pension or early retirement benefits, or education grants for the children. Possible incentives for cadaveric organ donation included reimbursal of health and funeral costs, or increase in widow/er's pension. Conclusion. The tendency may be toward reimbursement of costs rather than actual payments. A legal, ethical organ market could save thousands of human lives, but it must be correctly regulated.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/362143
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