Background: Infections are one of the main complications that cause high morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients. This study sought to estimate the incidence of infections and their main determinants in liver transplant recipients in the first year after transplantation. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 103 consecutive patients (72% men) who underwent transplantation in three centers in Northern (Bologna) and Central (Rome) Italy in 2005. Person-years (PY) at risk, incidence rates (IR), IR ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for viral, fungal, and bacterial infections. Results: The 103 patients (median age 55 years) contributed a total of 78.2 PYs, with a median follow-up of 286 days (interquartile range: 194 to 365 days). Fifty-eight patients (56.3%) experienced one or more infections, namely, 151 events (IR = 193.2 infections/100 PYs). IR for bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were 110.0, 56.3, and 26.9 infections/100 Pys, respectively. Within the first 30 days after transplantation, 37.9% patients (39/103) developed one or more events. Bacterial infections represented the most frequent event (86/151, 57.0%). Risk factors significantly associated with increased IR were gender (female), age (>50 years), prolonged intensive care stay volume of blood transfused during surgery and posttransplant, and need for retransplantation. Conclusions: These preliminary results showed the relevance of infectious events after liver transplantation especially those of bacterial etiology, and identified factors mainly associated with their occurrence. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Background. Infections are one of the main complications that cause high morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients. This study sought to estimate the incidence of infections and their main determinants in liver transplant recipients in the first year after transplantation. Patients and methods. A prospective study was conducted on 103 consecutive patients (72% men) who underwent liver transplantation in three centers in Northern (Bologna) and Central (Rome) Italy in 2005. Person-years (PY) at risk, incidence rates (IR), IR ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for viral, fungal, and bacterial infections. Results. The 103 patients (median age 55 years) contributed a total of 78.2 PYs, with a median follow-up of 286 days (interquartile range: 194 to 365 days). Fifty-eight patients (56.3%) experienced one or more infections, namely, 151 events (IR 193.2 infections/100 PYs). IR for bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were 110.0, 56.3, and 26.9 infections/100 Pys, respectively. Within the first 30 days after transplantation, 37.9% patients (39/103) developed one or more events. Bacterial infections represented the most frequent event (86/151, 57.0%). Risk factors significantly associated with increased IR were gender (female), age (50 years), prolonged intensive care stay, volume of blood transfused during surgery and posttransplant, and need for retransplantation. Conclusions. These preliminary results showed the relevance of infectious events after liver transplantation especially those of bacterial etiology, and identified factors mainly associated with their occurrence. IN THE LAST DECADES substantial improvements have been made in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive regimens. However, as a consequence of immunosuppression and exposure to community acquired and nosocomial pathogens, infections continue to be a major problem, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among liver transplant recipients.1,2 It has been estimated

Incidence and timing of infections after liver transplant in Italy / Piselli, P.; Zanfi, C.; Corazza, V.; Ferretti, S.; Scuderi, M.; Secchia, S. B.; Lauro, A.; Dazzi, A.; Pinna, A.; Ettorre, G. M.; Vennarecci, G.; Santoro, R.; Ferretti, G.; Gusman, N.; Berloco, P. B.; Grossi, P.; Angeletti, C.; Bellelli, S.; Costa, A. N.; Ippolito, G.; Girardi, E.; Serraino, D.. - In: TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS. - ISSN 0041-1345. - 39:6(2007), pp. 1950-1952. ((Intervento presentato al convegno 30th Congress of the Italian-Society-of-Organ-Transplantation tenutosi a Padova, ITALY nel NOV 30-DEC 02, 2006 [10.1016/j.transproceed.2007.05.056].

Incidence and timing of infections after liver transplant in Italy

Ferretti S.;Lauro A.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Ferretti G.;Gusman N.;Berloco P. B.;
2007

Abstract

Background. Infections are one of the main complications that cause high morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients. This study sought to estimate the incidence of infections and their main determinants in liver transplant recipients in the first year after transplantation. Patients and methods. A prospective study was conducted on 103 consecutive patients (72% men) who underwent liver transplantation in three centers in Northern (Bologna) and Central (Rome) Italy in 2005. Person-years (PY) at risk, incidence rates (IR), IR ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for viral, fungal, and bacterial infections. Results. The 103 patients (median age 55 years) contributed a total of 78.2 PYs, with a median follow-up of 286 days (interquartile range: 194 to 365 days). Fifty-eight patients (56.3%) experienced one or more infections, namely, 151 events (IR 193.2 infections/100 PYs). IR for bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were 110.0, 56.3, and 26.9 infections/100 Pys, respectively. Within the first 30 days after transplantation, 37.9% patients (39/103) developed one or more events. Bacterial infections represented the most frequent event (86/151, 57.0%). Risk factors significantly associated with increased IR were gender (female), age (50 years), prolonged intensive care stay, volume of blood transfused during surgery and posttransplant, and need for retransplantation. Conclusions. These preliminary results showed the relevance of infectious events after liver transplantation especially those of bacterial etiology, and identified factors mainly associated with their occurrence. IN THE LAST DECADES substantial improvements have been made in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive regimens. However, as a consequence of immunosuppression and exposure to community acquired and nosocomial pathogens, infections continue to be a major problem, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among liver transplant recipients.1,2 It has been estimated
Background: Infections are one of the main complications that cause high morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients. This study sought to estimate the incidence of infections and their main determinants in liver transplant recipients in the first year after transplantation. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 103 consecutive patients (72% men) who underwent transplantation in three centers in Northern (Bologna) and Central (Rome) Italy in 2005. Person-years (PY) at risk, incidence rates (IR), IR ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for viral, fungal, and bacterial infections. Results: The 103 patients (median age 55 years) contributed a total of 78.2 PYs, with a median follow-up of 286 days (interquartile range: 194 to 365 days). Fifty-eight patients (56.3%) experienced one or more infections, namely, 151 events (IR = 193.2 infections/100 PYs). IR for bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were 110.0, 56.3, and 26.9 infections/100 Pys, respectively. Within the first 30 days after transplantation, 37.9% patients (39/103) developed one or more events. Bacterial infections represented the most frequent event (86/151, 57.0%). Risk factors significantly associated with increased IR were gender (female), age (>50 years), prolonged intensive care stay volume of blood transfused during surgery and posttransplant, and need for retransplantation. Conclusions: These preliminary results showed the relevance of infectious events after liver transplantation especially those of bacterial etiology, and identified factors mainly associated with their occurrence. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
File allegati a questo prodotto
File Dimensione Formato  
Piselli_Timing-infections_2007.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: Versione editoriale (versione pubblicata con il layout dell'editore)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 61.84 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
61.84 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/360248
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 19
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 19
social impact