The distribution of drug delivery systems into the body is affected by plasma proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Furthermore, an exact understanding of the structure and morphology of drug carriers is fundamental to understand their role as gene delivery systems. In this work, the adsorption of human plasma proteins bound to cationic liposomes and to their relative DNA lipoplexes was compared. A shotgun proteomics approach based on HPLC coupled to high resolution MS was used for an efficient identification of proteins adsorbed onto liposome and lipoplex surfaces. The distinct pattern of proteins adsorbed helps to better understand the DNA compaction process. The experimental evidence leads us to hypothesize that polyanionic DNA is associated to the lipoplex surface and can interact with basic plasma proteins. Such a finding is in agreement with recent results showing that lipoplexes are multilamellar DNA/lipid domains partially decorated with DNA at their surface. Proteomics experiments showed that the lipoplex corona is rich of biologically relevant proteins such as fibronectin, histones and complement proteins. Our results provide novel insights to understand how lipoplexes activate the immune system and why they are rapidly cleared from the blood stream. The differences in the protein adsorption data detected in the presented experiments could be the basis for the establishment of a correlation between protein adsorption pattern and in vivo fate of intravenously administered nanoparticles and will require some consideration in the future. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

DNA affects the composition of lipoplex protein corona: A proteomics approach / Capriotti, ANNA LAURA; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Foglia, Patrizia; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Lagana', Aldo. - In: PROTEOMICS. - ISSN 1615-9853. - STAMPA. - 11:16(2011), pp. 3349-3358. [10.1002/pmic.201000803]

DNA affects the composition of lipoplex protein corona: A proteomics approach

CAPRIOTTI, ANNA LAURA;CARACCIOLO, Giulio;CARUSO, Giuseppe;FOGLIA, Patrizia;POZZI, DANIELA;SAMPERI, Roberto;LAGANA', Aldo
2011

Abstract

The distribution of drug delivery systems into the body is affected by plasma proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Furthermore, an exact understanding of the structure and morphology of drug carriers is fundamental to understand their role as gene delivery systems. In this work, the adsorption of human plasma proteins bound to cationic liposomes and to their relative DNA lipoplexes was compared. A shotgun proteomics approach based on HPLC coupled to high resolution MS was used for an efficient identification of proteins adsorbed onto liposome and lipoplex surfaces. The distinct pattern of proteins adsorbed helps to better understand the DNA compaction process. The experimental evidence leads us to hypothesize that polyanionic DNA is associated to the lipoplex surface and can interact with basic plasma proteins. Such a finding is in agreement with recent results showing that lipoplexes are multilamellar DNA/lipid domains partially decorated with DNA at their surface. Proteomics experiments showed that the lipoplex corona is rich of biologically relevant proteins such as fibronectin, histones and complement proteins. Our results provide novel insights to understand how lipoplexes activate the immune system and why they are rapidly cleared from the blood stream. The differences in the protein adsorption data detected in the presented experiments could be the basis for the establishment of a correlation between protein adsorption pattern and in vivo fate of intravenously administered nanoparticles and will require some consideration in the future. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
File allegati a questo prodotto
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/356726
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 27
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 26
social impact