In this paper three optical packet switching architectures employing the wavelength dimension for contention resolution are investigated and compared. In particular, two optical packet switches, equipped with shared tunable wavelength converters are analyzed and their complexity is evaluated in terms of the used number of wavelength converters and SOAs (Semiconductor Optical Amplifier). These switches are compared with the classical architecture in which converters are not shared. In the first considered architecture a partial converters sharing is adopted, i.e. the packets directed to the same output line share the same converter pool. In the second structure a complete converters sharing is adopted, i.e. the same converter pool is shared by all of the arriving packets. The analysis is carried out for various system parameters (number of input and output lines, number of wavelengths, . . .) and considering both unicast and multicast traffic. The main obtained results are that when unicast traffic is considered the architecture with complete converters sharing allows to obtain a remarkable saving of the employed number of converters with respect to both the classical switch and the architecture with partial converters sharing. However, this obtained saving is to be paid with a number of SOAs larger to be used. In the multicast traffic case the obtained gain reduces and it is not advantageous to adopt an architecture with complete converters sharing because this choice leads to have a small saving in terms of the needed number of converters and a remarkable used number of SOAs.

Comparison of Unicast/Multicast Optical Packet Switching Architectures using Wavelength Conversion / Eramo, Vincenzo; Listanti, Marco. - In: OPTICAL NETWORKS MAGAZINE. - ISSN 1388-6916. - STAMPA. - 3:2(2002), pp. 63-75.

Comparison of Unicast/Multicast Optical Packet Switching Architectures using Wavelength Conversion

ERAMO, Vincenzo;LISTANTI, Marco
2002

Abstract

In this paper three optical packet switching architectures employing the wavelength dimension for contention resolution are investigated and compared. In particular, two optical packet switches, equipped with shared tunable wavelength converters are analyzed and their complexity is evaluated in terms of the used number of wavelength converters and SOAs (Semiconductor Optical Amplifier). These switches are compared with the classical architecture in which converters are not shared. In the first considered architecture a partial converters sharing is adopted, i.e. the packets directed to the same output line share the same converter pool. In the second structure a complete converters sharing is adopted, i.e. the same converter pool is shared by all of the arriving packets. The analysis is carried out for various system parameters (number of input and output lines, number of wavelengths, . . .) and considering both unicast and multicast traffic. The main obtained results are that when unicast traffic is considered the architecture with complete converters sharing allows to obtain a remarkable saving of the employed number of converters with respect to both the classical switch and the architecture with partial converters sharing. However, this obtained saving is to be paid with a number of SOAs larger to be used. In the multicast traffic case the obtained gain reduces and it is not advantageous to adopt an architecture with complete converters sharing because this choice leads to have a small saving in terms of the needed number of converters and a remarkable used number of SOAs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/248570
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