The aim of this study was to assess whether a finger-tapping task (FTT), in which normal subjects repeatedly tap on a button while falling asleep, could be less disturbing and provide comparable information on the sleep onset period (SOP) with respect to a reaction-time task (RTT) to acoustic stimuli, in which the onset of sleep can be delayed by the arousing effect of the acoustic stimuli. Twelve subjects slept at their homes and six slept in a sleep laboratory for four consecutive nights. After one adaptation night and one baseline night, subjects were required to fall asleep in the third and fourth nights, bimanually performing either a RTT or a FTT. The results indicate that the FTT interfaces less with the SOP compared to the RTT and suggest that the FTT provides further advantages as a behavioral measure of the transition from wakefulness to sleep. In fact, the tapping task is associated with significantly shorter behavioral and polysomnographic sleep onset latencies and with a greater proportion of slow-wave sleep (SWS) during the transition from wakefulness to sleep compared with the RTT. Furthermore, correlations among subjective, behavioral, and electroencephalograph (EEG) latencies confirm the validity of the finger-tapping task as a behavioral measure of sleep onset.

A finger tapping task and a reaction time task as behavioral measures of the transition from wakefulness to sleep: which task interferes less with the sleep onset process? / Casagrande, Maria; DE GENNARO, Luigi; Violani, Cristiano; Braibanti, P.; Bertini, Mario. - In: SLEEP. - ISSN 0161-8105. - STAMPA. - 20:4(1997), pp. 301-312.

A finger tapping task and a reaction time task as behavioral measures of the transition from wakefulness to sleep: which task interferes less with the sleep onset process?

CASAGRANDE, Maria;DE GENNARO, Luigi;VIOLANI, Cristiano;BERTINI, Mario
1997

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess whether a finger-tapping task (FTT), in which normal subjects repeatedly tap on a button while falling asleep, could be less disturbing and provide comparable information on the sleep onset period (SOP) with respect to a reaction-time task (RTT) to acoustic stimuli, in which the onset of sleep can be delayed by the arousing effect of the acoustic stimuli. Twelve subjects slept at their homes and six slept in a sleep laboratory for four consecutive nights. After one adaptation night and one baseline night, subjects were required to fall asleep in the third and fourth nights, bimanually performing either a RTT or a FTT. The results indicate that the FTT interfaces less with the SOP compared to the RTT and suggest that the FTT provides further advantages as a behavioral measure of the transition from wakefulness to sleep. In fact, the tapping task is associated with significantly shorter behavioral and polysomnographic sleep onset latencies and with a greater proportion of slow-wave sleep (SWS) during the transition from wakefulness to sleep compared with the RTT. Furthermore, correlations among subjective, behavioral, and electroencephalograph (EEG) latencies confirm the validity of the finger-tapping task as a behavioral measure of sleep onset.
Sleep onset; Sleep latency; finger-tapping task; Behavioural measures of sleep onset; reaction-time task
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A finger tapping task and a reaction time task as behavioral measures of the transition from wakefulness to sleep: which task interferes less with the sleep onset process? / Casagrande, Maria; DE GENNARO, Luigi; Violani, Cristiano; Braibanti, P.; Bertini, Mario. - In: SLEEP. - ISSN 0161-8105. - STAMPA. - 20:4(1997), pp. 301-312.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/245111
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