OBJECTIVE: Epilepsy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, which, however, is rarely due to the epilepsy itself; suicide, on the other hand, is a chief cause of death among persons with epilepsy. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare data reported in representative studies of suicide mortality in epilepsy with data on mortality from epilepsy in the general population. METHODS: We searched Index Medicus to 2006 through MedLine. We also searched the World Health Statistics Annual to ascertain rates of mortality from epilepsy in the age groups indicated in the studies on patients with epilepsy for specific years and countries. RESULTS: We selected 30 studies comprising 51,216 persons, 188 of whom committed suicide and died. Results obtained for each study were processed together to calculate, per 100,000 individuals in the general population per year, the mean number of suicide deaths expected in persons with epilepsy with respect to the current prevalence of epilepsy. We found that the number of suicide deaths among persons with epilepsy is the same as the number of deaths from epilepsy, suggesting that the former are not included in mortality rates for epilepsy. Also, we found that, according to data derived from cohorts we selected, 32.5% of all deaths of persons with epilepsy are due to suicide and at least 13.5% of all registered suicides are committed by these persons. Study findings may not generalize to other samples, settings, and treatments, thus perhaps tending to exaggerate the phenomenon actually attainable under broader clinical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis indicates that suicide deaths in persons with epilepsy are a disturbingly frequent phenomenon that should be addressed to reduce mortality among patients with epilepsy dramatically. In particular, mortality rates for persons with epilepsy do not include mortality from suicide, greatly underestimating death rates and the need for suicide prevention strategies for these patients.

Death from suicide versus mortality from epilepsy in the epilepsies: A meta-analysis / Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo; Tatarelli, Roberto. - In: EPILEPSY & BEHAVIOR. - ISSN 1525-5050. - STAMPA. - 9:4(2006), pp. 641-648. [10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.06.019]

Death from suicide versus mortality from epilepsy in the epilepsies: A meta-analysis

POMPILI, Maurizio;GIRARDI, Paolo;TATARELLI, Roberto
2006

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Epilepsy is associated with an increased risk of mortality, which, however, is rarely due to the epilepsy itself; suicide, on the other hand, is a chief cause of death among persons with epilepsy. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare data reported in representative studies of suicide mortality in epilepsy with data on mortality from epilepsy in the general population. METHODS: We searched Index Medicus to 2006 through MedLine. We also searched the World Health Statistics Annual to ascertain rates of mortality from epilepsy in the age groups indicated in the studies on patients with epilepsy for specific years and countries. RESULTS: We selected 30 studies comprising 51,216 persons, 188 of whom committed suicide and died. Results obtained for each study were processed together to calculate, per 100,000 individuals in the general population per year, the mean number of suicide deaths expected in persons with epilepsy with respect to the current prevalence of epilepsy. We found that the number of suicide deaths among persons with epilepsy is the same as the number of deaths from epilepsy, suggesting that the former are not included in mortality rates for epilepsy. Also, we found that, according to data derived from cohorts we selected, 32.5% of all deaths of persons with epilepsy are due to suicide and at least 13.5% of all registered suicides are committed by these persons. Study findings may not generalize to other samples, settings, and treatments, thus perhaps tending to exaggerate the phenomenon actually attainable under broader clinical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis indicates that suicide deaths in persons with epilepsy are a disturbingly frequent phenomenon that should be addressed to reduce mortality among patients with epilepsy dramatically. In particular, mortality rates for persons with epilepsy do not include mortality from suicide, greatly underestimating death rates and the need for suicide prevention strategies for these patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/234623
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