Passive smoking is to be understood as involuntary inhalation by third parties of substances from the combustion of tobacco and it’s responsible for a considerable share of childhood respiratory disease, including bronchial asthma and acute respiratory infections, but also for the risk of lung cancer and ischemic diseases in adults. In humans, nicotine is mainly metabolized in the liver and in smaller amounts in the lung and brain, the main metabolite, excreted through the urine of the person, is cotinine [1]. Cotinine is the most representative metabolite, about 75% of nicotine, of which 10-15% is eliminated as such, 12-17% conjugate and the remaining part in other secondary metabolites. Cotinine is a known biomarker of exposure to active tobacco smoke, and numerous papers correlate its urinary concentration with the number of cigarettes smoked, but it is interesting to evaluate if it is a good biomarker of exposure also to low levels of active tobacco smoke (few cigarettes) or of passive smoke. In order to studies this, we collected two spot urine samples from 568 healthy children, 6-11 years old, who live with a variable number of smokers and reside in two Italian regions with different levels of urbanization and industrialization. LC-MS/MS determinations were carried out on a 4000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (Sciex), equipped with a TurboIonSprayTM interface. Chromatography was performed on an Atlantis dC18 column using variable proportions of 10 mM aqueous formic pH 3.75 acid and methanol at a flow-rate of 0.20 mL/min [2]; quantitative analyses were performed by method of additions in matrix using internal deuterated standard. Urinary concentrations of cotinine in children who have smoker cohabitants are significantly higher than those in children who live with non-smokers, both in the samples collected in the evening and in the next morning, regardless of place of residence. Moreover, the urinary cotinine levels were significantly higher in urine samples collected in the evening than those collected in the morning. No relations between urinary cotinine levels and urbanization and industrialization grades were observed. In addition, the urinary cotinine is confirmed as a good biomarker to secondhand smoke exposure since it positively correlates with the number of cigarettes smoked by cohabitants

Mass spectrometry in urinary cotinine determination as a passive tobacco smoke biomarker / Maccari, Chiara; Corradi, Massimo; Vitali, Matteo; Protano, Carmela; Spatari, Giovanna; Andreoli, Roberta. - (2023), pp. 17-17. (Intervento presentato al convegno 11th MS J-day tenutosi a Bari; Italy).

Mass spectrometry in urinary cotinine determination as a passive tobacco smoke biomarker

Matteo Vitali;Carmela Protano;
2023

Abstract

Passive smoking is to be understood as involuntary inhalation by third parties of substances from the combustion of tobacco and it’s responsible for a considerable share of childhood respiratory disease, including bronchial asthma and acute respiratory infections, but also for the risk of lung cancer and ischemic diseases in adults. In humans, nicotine is mainly metabolized in the liver and in smaller amounts in the lung and brain, the main metabolite, excreted through the urine of the person, is cotinine [1]. Cotinine is the most representative metabolite, about 75% of nicotine, of which 10-15% is eliminated as such, 12-17% conjugate and the remaining part in other secondary metabolites. Cotinine is a known biomarker of exposure to active tobacco smoke, and numerous papers correlate its urinary concentration with the number of cigarettes smoked, but it is interesting to evaluate if it is a good biomarker of exposure also to low levels of active tobacco smoke (few cigarettes) or of passive smoke. In order to studies this, we collected two spot urine samples from 568 healthy children, 6-11 years old, who live with a variable number of smokers and reside in two Italian regions with different levels of urbanization and industrialization. LC-MS/MS determinations were carried out on a 4000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (Sciex), equipped with a TurboIonSprayTM interface. Chromatography was performed on an Atlantis dC18 column using variable proportions of 10 mM aqueous formic pH 3.75 acid and methanol at a flow-rate of 0.20 mL/min [2]; quantitative analyses were performed by method of additions in matrix using internal deuterated standard. Urinary concentrations of cotinine in children who have smoker cohabitants are significantly higher than those in children who live with non-smokers, both in the samples collected in the evening and in the next morning, regardless of place of residence. Moreover, the urinary cotinine levels were significantly higher in urine samples collected in the evening than those collected in the morning. No relations between urinary cotinine levels and urbanization and industrialization grades were observed. In addition, the urinary cotinine is confirmed as a good biomarker to secondhand smoke exposure since it positively correlates with the number of cigarettes smoked by cohabitants
2023
11th MS J-day
04 Pubblicazione in atti di convegno::04d Abstract in atti di convegno
Mass spectrometry in urinary cotinine determination as a passive tobacco smoke biomarker / Maccari, Chiara; Corradi, Massimo; Vitali, Matteo; Protano, Carmela; Spatari, Giovanna; Andreoli, Roberta. - (2023), pp. 17-17. (Intervento presentato al convegno 11th MS J-day tenutosi a Bari; Italy).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1704458
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