Evidence has shown that imagining a complex action, like backward-walking, helps improve the execution of the gesture. Despite this, studies in sport psychology have provided heterogeneous results on the use of motor imagery (MI) to improve performance. We aimed to fill this gap by analyzing how sport experience influences backward-walking MI processes in a sample of young women (n = 41, mean age = 21 ± 2.2) divided into Active and Sedentary. All participants were allocated to two randomized mental chronometric tasks, in which they had first to imagine and then execute forward-walking (FW) and backward-walking (BW). The Isochrony Efficiency measured the difference between imagination and execution times in both conditions (FW and BW). Moreover, we analyzed the ability to vividly imagine FW and BW within various perspectives in both groups through the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire (VMIQ-2). Findings showed that active individuals performed better in the BW imagery task when compared to sedentary ones (F1,39 = 4.98; p = 0.03*), while there were no differences between groups in the FW imagery task (F1,39 = .10; p = 0.75). Further, VMIQ-2 had evidenced that the ability to imagine backward is influenced by perspective used. Specifically, the use of internal visual imagery (IVI) led to worse Isochrony Efficiency (t32,25 = 2.16; p = 0.04*), while the use of kinesthetic imagery (KIN) led to better Isochrony Efficiency (t32,25 = - 2.34; p = 0.03*). These results suggest a close relation between motor experience and complex motor imagery processes and open new insights for studying these mental processes.

Differences in motor imagery abilities in active and sedentary individuals: new insights from backward-walking imagination / Mandolesi, Laura; Passarello, Noemi; Lucidi, Fabio. - In: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0340-0727. - (2023). [10.1007/s00426-023-01876-y]

Differences in motor imagery abilities in active and sedentary individuals: new insights from backward-walking imagination

Laura Mandolesi;Noemi Passarello;Fabio Lucidi
2023

Abstract

Evidence has shown that imagining a complex action, like backward-walking, helps improve the execution of the gesture. Despite this, studies in sport psychology have provided heterogeneous results on the use of motor imagery (MI) to improve performance. We aimed to fill this gap by analyzing how sport experience influences backward-walking MI processes in a sample of young women (n = 41, mean age = 21 ± 2.2) divided into Active and Sedentary. All participants were allocated to two randomized mental chronometric tasks, in which they had first to imagine and then execute forward-walking (FW) and backward-walking (BW). The Isochrony Efficiency measured the difference between imagination and execution times in both conditions (FW and BW). Moreover, we analyzed the ability to vividly imagine FW and BW within various perspectives in both groups through the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire (VMIQ-2). Findings showed that active individuals performed better in the BW imagery task when compared to sedentary ones (F1,39 = 4.98; p = 0.03*), while there were no differences between groups in the FW imagery task (F1,39 = .10; p = 0.75). Further, VMIQ-2 had evidenced that the ability to imagine backward is influenced by perspective used. Specifically, the use of internal visual imagery (IVI) led to worse Isochrony Efficiency (t32,25 = 2.16; p = 0.04*), while the use of kinesthetic imagery (KIN) led to better Isochrony Efficiency (t32,25 = - 2.34; p = 0.03*). These results suggest a close relation between motor experience and complex motor imagery processes and open new insights for studying these mental processes.
2023
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Differences in motor imagery abilities in active and sedentary individuals: new insights from backward-walking imagination / Mandolesi, Laura; Passarello, Noemi; Lucidi, Fabio. - In: PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 0340-0727. - (2023). [10.1007/s00426-023-01876-y]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1695471
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