Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its binding protein LBP have emerged as potential contributors to the progression from overweight/obesity to overt metabolic diseases and NAFLD. While LPS is known to activate hepatocyte inflammation, thus contributing toward NAFLD development, the role of LBP is more intricate, and recent data have shown that experimental reduction in hepatic LBP promotes NAFLD progression. In this cross-sectional investigation, we evaluated circulating LBP in relation to obesity, NAFLD, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We recruited 186 individuals (M/F: 81/105; age: 47 +/- 10.4 years; BMI: 35.5 +/- 8.6 kg/m(2)); a subgroup (n = 81) underwent bariatric surgery with intra-operative VAT and liver biopsies. LBP levels were higher in obese individuals than non-obese individuals but were inversely correlated with the parameters of glucose metabolism. Reduced LBP predicted T2D independent of age, sex, and BMI (p < 0.001). LBP levels decreased across more severe stages of hepatosteatosis and lobular inflammation, and were inversely associated with VAT inflammation signatures. In conclusion, LBP levels are increased in obese individuals and are associated with a more favorable metabolic profile and lower NAFLD/NASH prevalence. A possible explanation for these findings is that hepatic LBP production may be triggered by chronic caloric excess and facilitate LPS degradation in the liver, thus protecting these individuals from the metabolic consequences of obesity.

Reduced Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein (LBP) Levels Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Adipose Inflammation in Human Obesity / Barchetta, I; Cimini, Fa; Sentinelli, F; Chiappetta, C; Di Cristofano, C; Silecchia, G; Leonetti, F; Baroni, Mg; Cavallo, Mg. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1661-6596. - 24:24(2023), pp. 1-13. [10.3390/ijms242417174]

Reduced Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein (LBP) Levels Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Adipose Inflammation in Human Obesity

Barchetta I
Primo
;
Cimini FA;Sentinelli F;Chiappetta C;Di Cristofano C;Silecchia G;Leonetti F;Baroni MG;Cavallo MG
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its binding protein LBP have emerged as potential contributors to the progression from overweight/obesity to overt metabolic diseases and NAFLD. While LPS is known to activate hepatocyte inflammation, thus contributing toward NAFLD development, the role of LBP is more intricate, and recent data have shown that experimental reduction in hepatic LBP promotes NAFLD progression. In this cross-sectional investigation, we evaluated circulating LBP in relation to obesity, NAFLD, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We recruited 186 individuals (M/F: 81/105; age: 47 +/- 10.4 years; BMI: 35.5 +/- 8.6 kg/m(2)); a subgroup (n = 81) underwent bariatric surgery with intra-operative VAT and liver biopsies. LBP levels were higher in obese individuals than non-obese individuals but were inversely correlated with the parameters of glucose metabolism. Reduced LBP predicted T2D independent of age, sex, and BMI (p < 0.001). LBP levels decreased across more severe stages of hepatosteatosis and lobular inflammation, and were inversely associated with VAT inflammation signatures. In conclusion, LBP levels are increased in obese individuals and are associated with a more favorable metabolic profile and lower NAFLD/NASH prevalence. A possible explanation for these findings is that hepatic LBP production may be triggered by chronic caloric excess and facilitate LPS degradation in the liver, thus protecting these individuals from the metabolic consequences of obesity.
2023
low-grade inflammation; insulin resistance; type 2 diabetes; nash; mafld; masld; liver fibrosis; visceral obesity; metabolic syndrome
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Reduced Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein (LBP) Levels Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Adipose Inflammation in Human Obesity / Barchetta, I; Cimini, Fa; Sentinelli, F; Chiappetta, C; Di Cristofano, C; Silecchia, G; Leonetti, F; Baroni, Mg; Cavallo, Mg. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1661-6596. - 24:24(2023), pp. 1-13. [10.3390/ijms242417174]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1693414
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