Research suggests that belief in conspiracy theories (CT) stems from basic psychological mechanisms and is linked to other belief systems (e.g., religious beliefs). While previous research has extensively examined individual and contextual variables associated with CT beliefs, it has not yet investigated the role of culture. In the current research, we tested, based on a situated cultural cognition perspective, the extent to which culture predicts CT beliefs. Using Hofstede’s model of cultural values, three nation-level analyses of data from 25, 19, and 18 countries using different measures of CT beliefs (Study 1, N = 5323; Study 2a, N = 12,255; Study 2b, N = 30,994) revealed positive associations between masculinity, collectivism, and CT beliefs. A crosssectional study among U.S. citizens (Study 3, N = 350), using individual-level measures of Hofstede’s values, replicated these findings. A meta-analysis of correlations across studies corroborated the presence of positive links between CT beliefs, collectivism, r = .31, 95% CI = [.15; .47], and masculinity, r = .39, 95% CI = [.18; .59]. Our results suggest that in addition to individual differences and contextual variables, cultural factors also play an important role in shaping CT beliefs.

Investigating the Links Between Cultural Values and Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Key Roles of Collectivism and Masculinity / Adam-Troian, Jais; Wagner-Egger, Pascal; Motyl, Matt; Arciszewski, Thomas; Imhoff, Roland; Zimmer, Felix; Klein, Olivier; Babinska, Maria; Bangerter, Adrian; Bilewicz, Michal; Blanuša, Nebojša; Bovan, Kosta; Bužarovska, Rumena; Cichocka, Aleksandra; Çelebi, Elif; Delouvée, Sylvain; Douglas, Karen M.; Dyrendal, Asbjørn; Gjoneska, Biljana; Graf, Sylvie; Gualda, Estrella; Hirschberger, Gilad; Kende, Anna; Krekó, Peter; Krouwel, Andre; Lamberty, Pia; Mari, Silvia; Milosevic, Jasna; Panasiti, MARIA SERENA; Pantazi, Myrto; Petkovski, Ljupcho; Porciello, Giuseppina; Prims, J. P.; Rabelo, André; Schepisi, Michael; Sutton, Robbie M.; Swami, Viren; Thórisdóttir, Hulda; Turjačanin, Vladimir; Zezelj, Iris; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem. - In: POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1467-9221. - (2021).

Investigating the Links Between Cultural Values and Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Key Roles of Collectivism and Masculinity

Biljana Gjoneska;Silvia Mari;Maria Serena Panasiti;Giuseppina Porciello;Michael Schepisi;
2021

Abstract

Research suggests that belief in conspiracy theories (CT) stems from basic psychological mechanisms and is linked to other belief systems (e.g., religious beliefs). While previous research has extensively examined individual and contextual variables associated with CT beliefs, it has not yet investigated the role of culture. In the current research, we tested, based on a situated cultural cognition perspective, the extent to which culture predicts CT beliefs. Using Hofstede’s model of cultural values, three nation-level analyses of data from 25, 19, and 18 countries using different measures of CT beliefs (Study 1, N = 5323; Study 2a, N = 12,255; Study 2b, N = 30,994) revealed positive associations between masculinity, collectivism, and CT beliefs. A crosssectional study among U.S. citizens (Study 3, N = 350), using individual-level measures of Hofstede’s values, replicated these findings. A meta-analysis of correlations across studies corroborated the presence of positive links between CT beliefs, collectivism, r = .31, 95% CI = [.15; .47], and masculinity, r = .39, 95% CI = [.18; .59]. Our results suggest that in addition to individual differences and contextual variables, cultural factors also play an important role in shaping CT beliefs.
2021
conspiracist beliefs; cultural values; situated cognition collectivism; masculinity; cross-cultural
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Investigating the Links Between Cultural Values and Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Key Roles of Collectivism and Masculinity / Adam-Troian, Jais; Wagner-Egger, Pascal; Motyl, Matt; Arciszewski, Thomas; Imhoff, Roland; Zimmer, Felix; Klein, Olivier; Babinska, Maria; Bangerter, Adrian; Bilewicz, Michal; Blanuša, Nebojša; Bovan, Kosta; Bužarovska, Rumena; Cichocka, Aleksandra; Çelebi, Elif; Delouvée, Sylvain; Douglas, Karen M.; Dyrendal, Asbjørn; Gjoneska, Biljana; Graf, Sylvie; Gualda, Estrella; Hirschberger, Gilad; Kende, Anna; Krekó, Peter; Krouwel, Andre; Lamberty, Pia; Mari, Silvia; Milosevic, Jasna; Panasiti, MARIA SERENA; Pantazi, Myrto; Petkovski, Ljupcho; Porciello, Giuseppina; Prims, J. P.; Rabelo, André; Schepisi, Michael; Sutton, Robbie M.; Swami, Viren; Thórisdóttir, Hulda; Turjačanin, Vladimir; Zezelj, Iris; van Prooijen, Jan-Willem. - In: POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY. - ISSN 1467-9221. - (2021).
File allegati a questo prodotto
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1682795
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 53
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 47
social impact