Social prediction is a key feature of social cognition (SC), a function in which the modulating role of the cerebellum is recognized. Accordingly, cerebellar alterations are reported in cerebellar pathologies, neurodevelopmental disorders, and psychiatric conditions that show SC deficits. Nevertheless, to date, no study has directly compared populations representative of these three conditions with respect to SC and cerebellar alterations. Therefore, the present exploratory study aimed to compare the SC profiles of individuals with cerebellar neurodegenerative disorders (CB), autism (ASD), bipolar disorder type 2 (BD2), or healthy subjects (HS) using a battery of social tests requiring different degrees of prediction processing. The patterns of cerebellar grey matter (GM) alterations were compared among the groups using voxel-based morphometry. Compared to HS, the clinical groups showed common SC deficits in tasks involving a moderate to high level of prediction. The behavioural results of the clinical groups are consistent with the presence of overlapping GM reduction in cerebellar right Crus II, an area notably involved in complex social processing and prediction. Although exploratory and preliminary, these results deepen the cerebellar role in social prediction and highlight the transdiagnostic value of the cerebellum in social functioning and prediction in pathologies of different aetiologies, forecasting novel possibilities for shared interventions.

The cerebellum gets social: Evidence from an exploratory study of cerebellar, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders / Olivito, G; Siciliano, L; Clausi, S; Lupo, M; Baiocco, R; Gragnani, A; Saettoni, M; Delle Chiaie, R; Laghi, F; Leggio, M. - In: BIOMEDICINES. - ISSN 2227-9059. - 2:11(2023), pp. 1-19. [10.3390/biomedicines11020309]

The cerebellum gets social: Evidence from an exploratory study of cerebellar, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders

Olivito G
;
Siciliano L;Baiocco R;Delle Chiaie R;Laghi F;Leggio M
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Social prediction is a key feature of social cognition (SC), a function in which the modulating role of the cerebellum is recognized. Accordingly, cerebellar alterations are reported in cerebellar pathologies, neurodevelopmental disorders, and psychiatric conditions that show SC deficits. Nevertheless, to date, no study has directly compared populations representative of these three conditions with respect to SC and cerebellar alterations. Therefore, the present exploratory study aimed to compare the SC profiles of individuals with cerebellar neurodegenerative disorders (CB), autism (ASD), bipolar disorder type 2 (BD2), or healthy subjects (HS) using a battery of social tests requiring different degrees of prediction processing. The patterns of cerebellar grey matter (GM) alterations were compared among the groups using voxel-based morphometry. Compared to HS, the clinical groups showed common SC deficits in tasks involving a moderate to high level of prediction. The behavioural results of the clinical groups are consistent with the presence of overlapping GM reduction in cerebellar right Crus II, an area notably involved in complex social processing and prediction. Although exploratory and preliminary, these results deepen the cerebellar role in social prediction and highlight the transdiagnostic value of the cerebellum in social functioning and prediction in pathologies of different aetiologies, forecasting novel possibilities for shared interventions.
2023
prediction; cerebro-cerebellar circuits; cerebellar atrophy; social cognition; cerebellar pathologies; autism; bipolar disorders; voxel-based morphometry
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
The cerebellum gets social: Evidence from an exploratory study of cerebellar, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders / Olivito, G; Siciliano, L; Clausi, S; Lupo, M; Baiocco, R; Gragnani, A; Saettoni, M; Delle Chiaie, R; Laghi, F; Leggio, M. - In: BIOMEDICINES. - ISSN 2227-9059. - 2:11(2023), pp. 1-19. [10.3390/biomedicines11020309]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1676471
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