Obesity is known to interfere with reproductive outcomes in polycystic ovary syndrome. There is no consensus regarding the impact of obesity on reproductive outcomes after ovarian ablative therapy (OAT) and there is no level I evidence to answer this question. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the strength of the association between obesity and ovulation or pregnancy rates after OAT. MEDLINE and several other databases were searched from 2000 to September 2011 for studies reporting on OAT and reproductive outcomes. Data were synthesized to determine the relative risk of reproductive outcomes (ovulation and pregnancy) in lean (body mass index <25 kg/m(2)) compared with overweight or obese women. The study obtained 15 data sets (14 articles) for analysis, which included 905 subjects in the obese group and 879 subjects in the lean group. Lean women had increased ovulation rates (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22-1.66) compared with obese women. Pregnancy rates also showed a similar trend (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.39-2.17). Reproductive outcomes were generally better in younger women, more recent studies and randomized controlled trials. It is concluded that lean women respond better to OAT than their obese counterparts. These epidemiological observations indicate that obesity alters reproductive outcomes after OAT negatively. RBM Online (c) 2012, Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Impact of obesity on reproductive outcomes after ovarian ablative therapy in PCOS: a collaborative meta-analysis / Baghdadi, Leena R; Abu Hashim, Hatem; Amer, Saad A K; Palomba, Stefano; Falbo, Angela; Al-Ojaimi, Eftekhar; Ott, Johannes; Zhu, Wenjie; Fernandez, Hervé; Nasr, Ahmed; Ramzy, Abdel Maguid; Clark, Justin; Doi, Suhail A R. - In: REPRODUCTIVE BIOMEDICINE ONLINE. - ISSN 1472-6483. - 25:3(2012), pp. 227-241. [10.1016/j.rbmo.2012.05.010]

Impact of obesity on reproductive outcomes after ovarian ablative therapy in PCOS: a collaborative meta-analysis

Palomba, Stefano;
2012

Abstract

Obesity is known to interfere with reproductive outcomes in polycystic ovary syndrome. There is no consensus regarding the impact of obesity on reproductive outcomes after ovarian ablative therapy (OAT) and there is no level I evidence to answer this question. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the strength of the association between obesity and ovulation or pregnancy rates after OAT. MEDLINE and several other databases were searched from 2000 to September 2011 for studies reporting on OAT and reproductive outcomes. Data were synthesized to determine the relative risk of reproductive outcomes (ovulation and pregnancy) in lean (body mass index <25 kg/m(2)) compared with overweight or obese women. The study obtained 15 data sets (14 articles) for analysis, which included 905 subjects in the obese group and 879 subjects in the lean group. Lean women had increased ovulation rates (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22-1.66) compared with obese women. Pregnancy rates also showed a similar trend (RR 1.73, 95% CI 1.39-2.17). Reproductive outcomes were generally better in younger women, more recent studies and randomized controlled trials. It is concluded that lean women respond better to OAT than their obese counterparts. These epidemiological observations indicate that obesity alters reproductive outcomes after OAT negatively. RBM Online (c) 2012, Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
2012
obesity; ovarian ablative therapy; ovarian drilling; ovulation; PCOS; pregnancy
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Impact of obesity on reproductive outcomes after ovarian ablative therapy in PCOS: a collaborative meta-analysis / Baghdadi, Leena R; Abu Hashim, Hatem; Amer, Saad A K; Palomba, Stefano; Falbo, Angela; Al-Ojaimi, Eftekhar; Ott, Johannes; Zhu, Wenjie; Fernandez, Hervé; Nasr, Ahmed; Ramzy, Abdel Maguid; Clark, Justin; Doi, Suhail A R. - In: REPRODUCTIVE BIOMEDICINE ONLINE. - ISSN 1472-6483. - 25:3(2012), pp. 227-241. [10.1016/j.rbmo.2012.05.010]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1663608
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