It is well known that many Mesolithic and Early Neolithic sites were uncovered during the past century in the Iron Gates region of the North-Central Balkans. The application of diverse analyses on the bioarchaeological remains and artefacts raised many questions, but also offered new ideas about the Mesolithic–Neolithic transitional period in the Middle and Lower course of the Danube. Communities in the Iron Gates consumed fish and exploited the riverbank in prehistory. The stable isotope analyses are implying that these human groups fed on aquatic resources in some periods more than others. Fish remains were also found in settlements, and based on fish-related imagery on sculpted boulders and other artefacts, the bond between the people, river, and the ecosystem was compelling. The idea of this article is to present the possible ways of fish processing at Lepenski Vir using chipped stone tools. Three integrated methodologies, with high levels of interpretation, were applied: use-wear, residue, and archaeozoological analyses. Use-wear and residue analyses were performed on both archaeological and experimental chipped stone tools. The results are considered together with the traces of butchery observed on archaeological samples of fish bones, creating a more coherent picture of the everyday habits of the Iron Gates populations.

Fish Processing in the Iron Gates Region During the Transitional and Early Neolithic Period: An Integrated Approach / Petrović, Anđa; Lemorini, Cristina; Cesaro, Stella Nunziante; Živaljević, Ivana. - In: OPEN ARCHAEOLOGY. - ISSN 2300-6560. - 8:1(2022), pp. 796-818. [10.1515/opar-2022-0258]

Fish Processing in the Iron Gates Region During the Transitional and Early Neolithic Period: An Integrated Approach

Lemorini, Cristina;
2022

Abstract

It is well known that many Mesolithic and Early Neolithic sites were uncovered during the past century in the Iron Gates region of the North-Central Balkans. The application of diverse analyses on the bioarchaeological remains and artefacts raised many questions, but also offered new ideas about the Mesolithic–Neolithic transitional period in the Middle and Lower course of the Danube. Communities in the Iron Gates consumed fish and exploited the riverbank in prehistory. The stable isotope analyses are implying that these human groups fed on aquatic resources in some periods more than others. Fish remains were also found in settlements, and based on fish-related imagery on sculpted boulders and other artefacts, the bond between the people, river, and the ecosystem was compelling. The idea of this article is to present the possible ways of fish processing at Lepenski Vir using chipped stone tools. Three integrated methodologies, with high levels of interpretation, were applied: use-wear, residue, and archaeozoological analyses. Use-wear and residue analyses were performed on both archaeological and experimental chipped stone tools. The results are considered together with the traces of butchery observed on archaeological samples of fish bones, creating a more coherent picture of the everyday habits of the Iron Gates populations.
2022
use-wear analysis; residue analysis; chipped stone tools; fish; experimental archaeology; Iron Gates; Lepenski Vir; Mesolithic–Neolithic transition; Early Neolithic
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
Fish Processing in the Iron Gates Region During the Transitional and Early Neolithic Period: An Integrated Approach / Petrović, Anđa; Lemorini, Cristina; Cesaro, Stella Nunziante; Živaljević, Ivana. - In: OPEN ARCHAEOLOGY. - ISSN 2300-6560. - 8:1(2022), pp. 796-818. [10.1515/opar-2022-0258]
File allegati a questo prodotto
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1658254
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact