Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently involved in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway infections. Biofilm, motility, production of toxins and the invasion of host cells are different factors that increase P. aeruginosa's virulence. The sessile phenotype offers protection to bacterial cells and resistance to antimicrobials and host immune attacks. Motility also contributes to bacterial colonization of surfaces and, consequently, to biofilm formation. Furthermore, the ability to adhere is the prelude for the internalization into lung cells, a common immune evasion mechanism used by most intracellular bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa. In previous studies we evaluated the activity of metalloprotease serratiopeptidase (SPEP) in impairing virulence-related properties in Gram-positive bacteria. This work aimed to investigate SPEP's effects on different physiological aspects related to the virulence of P. aeruginosa isolated from CF patients, such as biofilm production, pyoverdine and pyocyanin production and invasion in alveolar epithelial cells. Obtained results showed that SPEP was able to impair the attachment to inert surfaces as well as adhesion/invasion of eukaryotic cells. Conversely, SPEP's effect on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production was strongly strain-dependent, with an increase and/or a decrease of their production. Moreover, SPEP seemed to increase swarming motility and staphylolytic protease production. Our results suggest that a large number of clinical strains should be studied in-depth before drawing definitive conclusions. Why different strains sometimes react in opposing ways to a specific treatment is of great interest and will be the object of future studies. Therefore, SPEP affects P. aeruginosa's physiology by differently acting on several bacterial factors related to its virulence.

Serratiopeptidase affects the physiology of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

Marco Artini
Co-primo
;
Gianluca Vrenna
Co-primo
;
Marika Trecca
Secondo
;
Rosanna Papa
Penultimo
;
Laura Selan
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently involved in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway infections. Biofilm, motility, production of toxins and the invasion of host cells are different factors that increase P. aeruginosa's virulence. The sessile phenotype offers protection to bacterial cells and resistance to antimicrobials and host immune attacks. Motility also contributes to bacterial colonization of surfaces and, consequently, to biofilm formation. Furthermore, the ability to adhere is the prelude for the internalization into lung cells, a common immune evasion mechanism used by most intracellular bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa. In previous studies we evaluated the activity of metalloprotease serratiopeptidase (SPEP) in impairing virulence-related properties in Gram-positive bacteria. This work aimed to investigate SPEP's effects on different physiological aspects related to the virulence of P. aeruginosa isolated from CF patients, such as biofilm production, pyoverdine and pyocyanin production and invasion in alveolar epithelial cells. Obtained results showed that SPEP was able to impair the attachment to inert surfaces as well as adhesion/invasion of eukaryotic cells. Conversely, SPEP's effect on pyocyanin and pyoverdine production was strongly strain-dependent, with an increase and/or a decrease of their production. Moreover, SPEP seemed to increase swarming motility and staphylolytic protease production. Our results suggest that a large number of clinical strains should be studied in-depth before drawing definitive conclusions. Why different strains sometimes react in opposing ways to a specific treatment is of great interest and will be the object of future studies. Therefore, SPEP affects P. aeruginosa's physiology by differently acting on several bacterial factors related to its virulence.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1658191
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