Cantharidin (CTD) is a defensive compound autogenously and exclusively produced by two phylogenetically related beetle families: Meloidae and Oedemeridae. Although this molecule usually acts as a strong deterrent against potential predators and parasites, some arthropod species, collectively named 'canthariphilous species', are attracted to CTD. Some species can sequester CTD from the CTD-producing species, using it as a chemical defense against enemies. The present paper focuses on the first-ever description of canthariphilous interactions between a checkered beetle species (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and a CTD -producing species. Field observations revealed individuals of the phytophagous beetle Tilloidea transversalis (Charpentier, 1825) (Coleoptera: Cleridae) biting individuals of the blister beetle Lydus trimaculatus (Fabricius, 1775) (Coleoptera: Meloidae). Laboratory behavioral experiments followed to verify if this peculiar behavior of T. transversalis also occurs on other co-occurring species. Moreover, chemical analyses were performed to assess whether T. transversalis can sequester CTD. Our results show that T. transversalis only attacks CTD-producing species. However, while chemical analyses prove that T transversalis can sequester CTD from the hemolymph of L. trimaculatus, some clues (based on a CTD-baited traps sampling) suggest that this beetle, contrarily to other canthariphilous species, does not appear to show a high attraction to pure synthetic CTD.Thus, other unknown signals, alone or in combination with CTD, could be implicated in triggering the canthariphilous behaviors of T. transversalis.

New Evidence of Canthariphily: Tilloidea transversalis (Coleoptera: Cleridae) Sequestering Cantharidin From Lydus trimaculatus (Coleoptera: Meloidae) / Molfini, Marco; Stefanuto, Luca; Gisondi, Silvia; Gasperi, Tecla; Di Giulio, Andrea; Mancini, Emiliano; Bologna, Marco A. - In: JOURNAL OF INSECT SCIENCE. - ISSN 1536-2442. - 22:3(2022), pp. 1-7. [10.1093/jisesa/ieac035]

New Evidence of Canthariphily: Tilloidea transversalis (Coleoptera: Cleridae) Sequestering Cantharidin From Lydus trimaculatus (Coleoptera: Meloidae)

Mancini, Emiliano
Penultimo
Conceptualization
;
2022

Abstract

Cantharidin (CTD) is a defensive compound autogenously and exclusively produced by two phylogenetically related beetle families: Meloidae and Oedemeridae. Although this molecule usually acts as a strong deterrent against potential predators and parasites, some arthropod species, collectively named 'canthariphilous species', are attracted to CTD. Some species can sequester CTD from the CTD-producing species, using it as a chemical defense against enemies. The present paper focuses on the first-ever description of canthariphilous interactions between a checkered beetle species (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and a CTD -producing species. Field observations revealed individuals of the phytophagous beetle Tilloidea transversalis (Charpentier, 1825) (Coleoptera: Cleridae) biting individuals of the blister beetle Lydus trimaculatus (Fabricius, 1775) (Coleoptera: Meloidae). Laboratory behavioral experiments followed to verify if this peculiar behavior of T. transversalis also occurs on other co-occurring species. Moreover, chemical analyses were performed to assess whether T. transversalis can sequester CTD. Our results show that T. transversalis only attacks CTD-producing species. However, while chemical analyses prove that T transversalis can sequester CTD from the hemolymph of L. trimaculatus, some clues (based on a CTD-baited traps sampling) suggest that this beetle, contrarily to other canthariphilous species, does not appear to show a high attraction to pure synthetic CTD.Thus, other unknown signals, alone or in combination with CTD, could be implicated in triggering the canthariphilous behaviors of T. transversalis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1658011
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