Vitamin A (VA) deficiency is associated with increased host susceptibility to infections, but evidence on its role in the prevention and management of viral infections is still lacking. This review aimed at summarizing the effects of VA supplementation against viral infections to support clinicians in evaluating supplemental treatments. PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched. Randomized clinical trials comparing the direct effects of VA oral supplementation in any form vs. placebo or standard of care in the prevention and/or management of confirmed viral infections in people of any age were included. A narrative synthesis of the results was performed. The revised Cochrane Risk-Of-Bias tool was used to assess quality. Overall, 40 articles of heterogeneous quality were included. We found data on infections sustained by Retroviridae (n = 17), Caliciviradae (n = 2), Flaviviridae (n = 1), Papillomaviridae (n = 3), Pneumoviridae (n = 4), and Paramyxoviridae (n = 13). Studies were published between 1987 and 2017 and mostly conducted in Africa. The findings were heterogeneous across and within viral families regarding virological, immunological, and biological response, and no meaningful results were found in the prevention of viral infections. For a few diseases, VA-supplemented individuals had a better prognosis and improved outcomes, including clearance of HPV lesions or reduction in some measles-related complications. The effects of VA oral supplementation seem encouraging in relation to the management of a few viral infections. Difference in populations considered, variety in recruitment and treatment protocols might explain the heterogeneity of the results. Further investigations are needed to better identify the benefits of VA administration.

What are the effects of Vitamin A oral supplementation in the prevention and management of viral infections? A systematic review of randomized clinical trials / Sinopoli, Alessandra; Caminada, Susanna; Isonne, Claudia; Santoro, Maria; Baccolini, Valentina. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 14:19(2022), pp. 1-21. [10.3390/nu14194081]

What are the effects of Vitamin A oral supplementation in the prevention and management of viral infections? A systematic review of randomized clinical trials

Alessandra Sinopoli
Primo
;
Susanna Caminada;Claudia Isonne;Valentina Baccolini
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Vitamin A (VA) deficiency is associated with increased host susceptibility to infections, but evidence on its role in the prevention and management of viral infections is still lacking. This review aimed at summarizing the effects of VA supplementation against viral infections to support clinicians in evaluating supplemental treatments. PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched. Randomized clinical trials comparing the direct effects of VA oral supplementation in any form vs. placebo or standard of care in the prevention and/or management of confirmed viral infections in people of any age were included. A narrative synthesis of the results was performed. The revised Cochrane Risk-Of-Bias tool was used to assess quality. Overall, 40 articles of heterogeneous quality were included. We found data on infections sustained by Retroviridae (n = 17), Caliciviradae (n = 2), Flaviviridae (n = 1), Papillomaviridae (n = 3), Pneumoviridae (n = 4), and Paramyxoviridae (n = 13). Studies were published between 1987 and 2017 and mostly conducted in Africa. The findings were heterogeneous across and within viral families regarding virological, immunological, and biological response, and no meaningful results were found in the prevention of viral infections. For a few diseases, VA-supplemented individuals had a better prognosis and improved outcomes, including clearance of HPV lesions or reduction in some measles-related complications. The effects of VA oral supplementation seem encouraging in relation to the management of a few viral infections. Difference in populations considered, variety in recruitment and treatment protocols might explain the heterogeneity of the results. Further investigations are needed to better identify the benefits of VA administration.
2022
vitamin a; micronutrients; systematic review; viral infections; dietary supplements; humans; randomized controlled trials
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01g Articolo di rassegna (Review)
What are the effects of Vitamin A oral supplementation in the prevention and management of viral infections? A systematic review of randomized clinical trials / Sinopoli, Alessandra; Caminada, Susanna; Isonne, Claudia; Santoro, Maria; Baccolini, Valentina. - In: NUTRIENTS. - ISSN 2072-6643. - 14:19(2022), pp. 1-21. [10.3390/nu14194081]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1657509
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