Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary approach focused on the development of innovative bioartificial substitutes for damaged organs and tissues. For skeletal muscle, the measurement of contractile capability represents a crucial aspect for tissue replacement, drug screening and personalized medicine. To date, the measurement of engineered muscle tissues is rather invasive and not continuous. In this context, we proposed an innovative sensor for the continuous monitoring of engineered-muscle-tissue contractility through an embedded technique. The sensor is based on the calibrated deflection of one of the engineered tissue's supporting pins, whose movements are measured using a noninvasive optical method. The sensor was calibrated to return force values through the use of a step linear motor and a micro-force transducer. Experimental results showed that the embedded sensor did not alter the correct maturation of the engineered muscle tissue. Finally, as proof of concept, we demonstrated the ability of the sensor to capture alterations in the force contractility of the engineered muscle tissues subjected to serum deprivation.

The development of an innovative embedded sensor for the optical measurement of ex-vivo engineered muscle tissue contractility / Apa, Ludovica; Cosentino, Marianna; Forconi, Flavia; Musarò, Antonio; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Del Prete, Zaccaria. - In: SENSORS. - ISSN 1424-8220. - 22:18(2022), pp. 1-15. [10.3390/s22186878]

The development of an innovative embedded sensor for the optical measurement of ex-vivo engineered muscle tissue contractility

Apa, Ludovica;Cosentino, Marianna;Forconi, Flavia;Musarò, Antonio;Rizzuto, Emanuele
;
Del Prete, Zaccaria
2022

Abstract

Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary approach focused on the development of innovative bioartificial substitutes for damaged organs and tissues. For skeletal muscle, the measurement of contractile capability represents a crucial aspect for tissue replacement, drug screening and personalized medicine. To date, the measurement of engineered muscle tissues is rather invasive and not continuous. In this context, we proposed an innovative sensor for the continuous monitoring of engineered-muscle-tissue contractility through an embedded technique. The sensor is based on the calibrated deflection of one of the engineered tissue's supporting pins, whose movements are measured using a noninvasive optical method. The sensor was calibrated to return force values through the use of a step linear motor and a micro-force transducer. Experimental results showed that the embedded sensor did not alter the correct maturation of the engineered muscle tissue. Finally, as proof of concept, we demonstrated the ability of the sensor to capture alterations in the force contractility of the engineered muscle tissues subjected to serum deprivation.
2022
3D in-vitro system; contractile force measurements; electrical stimulation; noninvasive measurements; optical tracking algorithm; sensor development; skeletal muscle; tissue biomechanics; tissue engineering; muscle; skeletal; muscle contraction; tissue engineering
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
The development of an innovative embedded sensor for the optical measurement of ex-vivo engineered muscle tissue contractility / Apa, Ludovica; Cosentino, Marianna; Forconi, Flavia; Musarò, Antonio; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Del Prete, Zaccaria. - In: SENSORS. - ISSN 1424-8220. - 22:18(2022), pp. 1-15. [10.3390/s22186878]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1656751
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