With the advent of digital technologies, gradually setting traditional media for Motion Picture and Television industries into retirement (film and video tapes above all), the need to reproduce the informative and the artistic content of video assets becomes a key technological issue in the business. Different physical media involved in distribution formats (theatre/studio/home projectors, TVs, LCD/OLED displays, web/phone browsers, etc.) all have different gamut and nonlinear behaviours. Furthermore, film and video legacy dictate etrocompatibility with at least 35/16mm film and the SD-video world (mainly for preservation and restoration/cleaning of old audiovisual assets). During shooting sessions for cinema, shows and commercials, several technical aspects involve Colour Science: not only for quickly assessing the overall ‘look’ of each scene, but also to assess its ‘workability’ in further post-production work: colour-correction (CC) and visual effects (VFX) above all. In this case a correct exposure reaching neither the gamut boundaries nor the digital camera’s dynamic/colorimetric limitations is in order. Post-production houses need to be able to cope with all the different colour spaces involved within the whole production chains, exploiting the benefits and circumventing the drawbacks of each. In this paper colour spaces used in the post-production business will be briefly recapped: they are mainly based on ITU-R BT.709 RGB and CIE XYZ colour models, but stem different gamut and properties due to the richness of physical media involved: from frame-per-file based management, to digital projectors for Digital Cinema Packages (DCPs), to optical and magnetic film, to HD digital tapes. A short introduction to Colour LUTs follows, and their employment as a way of rapidly performing digital Colour Management with either technical and creative intents is shown: conforming to different output devices as colour space conversions, as well as creative-intent colour grading. In the last chapter some Geometry/Calculus tools for Colour Management are simply introduced, which make up the author’s current research field.

Colour Management in motion picture and television industries

Arrighetti, Walter
Primo
2011

Abstract

With the advent of digital technologies, gradually setting traditional media for Motion Picture and Television industries into retirement (film and video tapes above all), the need to reproduce the informative and the artistic content of video assets becomes a key technological issue in the business. Different physical media involved in distribution formats (theatre/studio/home projectors, TVs, LCD/OLED displays, web/phone browsers, etc.) all have different gamut and nonlinear behaviours. Furthermore, film and video legacy dictate etrocompatibility with at least 35/16mm film and the SD-video world (mainly for preservation and restoration/cleaning of old audiovisual assets). During shooting sessions for cinema, shows and commercials, several technical aspects involve Colour Science: not only for quickly assessing the overall ‘look’ of each scene, but also to assess its ‘workability’ in further post-production work: colour-correction (CC) and visual effects (VFX) above all. In this case a correct exposure reaching neither the gamut boundaries nor the digital camera’s dynamic/colorimetric limitations is in order. Post-production houses need to be able to cope with all the different colour spaces involved within the whole production chains, exploiting the benefits and circumventing the drawbacks of each. In this paper colour spaces used in the post-production business will be briefly recapped: they are mainly based on ITU-R BT.709 RGB and CIE XYZ colour models, but stem different gamut and properties due to the richness of physical media involved: from frame-per-file based management, to digital projectors for Digital Cinema Packages (DCPs), to optical and magnetic film, to HD digital tapes. A short introduction to Colour LUTs follows, and their employment as a way of rapidly performing digital Colour Management with either technical and creative intents is shown: conforming to different output devices as colour space conversions, as well as creative-intent colour grading. In the last chapter some Geometry/Calculus tools for Colour Management are simply introduced, which make up the author’s current research field.
978-88-387-6043-3
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1656555
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