Bladder cancer (BC) represents the second most common genitourinary malignancy. The major risk factors for BC include age, gender, smoking, occupational exposure, and infections. The BC etiology and pathogenesis have not been fully defined yet. Since catabolites are excreted through the urinary tract, the diet may play a pivotal role in bladder carcinogenesis. Meat, conventionally classified as “red”, “white” or “processed”, represents a significant risk factor for chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. In particular, red and processed meat consumption seems to increase the risk of BC onset. The most accepted mechanism proposed for explaining the correlation between meat intake and BC involves the generation of carcinogens, such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by high-temperature cooking. This evidence claims the consumption limitation of meat. We reviewed the current literature on potential biological mechanisms underlying the impact of meat (red, white, and processed) intake on the increased risk of BC development and progression. Toward this purpose, we performed an online search on PubMed using the term "bladder cancer” in combination with “meat”, “red meat”, “white meat” or “processed meat”. Although some studies did not report any association between BC and meat intake, several reports highlighted a positive correlation between red or processed meat intake, especially salami, pastrami, corned beef and bacon, and BC risk. We speculate that a reduction or rather a weighting of the consumption of red and processed meat can reduce the risk of developing BC. Obviously, this remark claims future indications regarding food education (type of meat to be preferred, quantity of red meat to be eaten and how to cook it) to reduce the risk of developing BC. Further well-designed prospective studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

The impact of meat intake on bladder cancer incidence: is it really a relevant risk? / Aveta, Achille; Cacciapuoti, Crescenzo; Barone, Biagio; Di Di Zazzo, Erika; DEL GIUDICE, Francesco; Maggi, Martina; Ferro, Matteo; Terracciano, Daniela; Busetto, GIAN MARIA; Lucarelli, GIUSEPPE TIZIANO; Sabin Tataru, Octavian; Montanari, Emanuele; Fabio Mirto, Benito; Falcone, Alfonso; Giampaglia, Gaetano; Sicignano, Enrico; Capone, Federico Giovanni; Villano, Gianluca; Angellotto, Pasquale; Manfredi, Celeste; Napolitano, Luigi; Imbimbo, Ciro; Domenico Pandolfo, Savio; Crocetto, Felice. - In: CANCERS. - ISSN 2072-6694. - 14:19(2022), p. 4775. [10.3390/cancers14194775]

The impact of meat intake on bladder cancer incidence: is it really a relevant risk?

Francesco Del Del Giudice;Martina Maggi;Gian Maria Busetto;Giuseppe Lucarelli;Federico Capone;Luigi Napolitano;
2022

Abstract

Bladder cancer (BC) represents the second most common genitourinary malignancy. The major risk factors for BC include age, gender, smoking, occupational exposure, and infections. The BC etiology and pathogenesis have not been fully defined yet. Since catabolites are excreted through the urinary tract, the diet may play a pivotal role in bladder carcinogenesis. Meat, conventionally classified as “red”, “white” or “processed”, represents a significant risk factor for chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. In particular, red and processed meat consumption seems to increase the risk of BC onset. The most accepted mechanism proposed for explaining the correlation between meat intake and BC involves the generation of carcinogens, such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by high-temperature cooking. This evidence claims the consumption limitation of meat. We reviewed the current literature on potential biological mechanisms underlying the impact of meat (red, white, and processed) intake on the increased risk of BC development and progression. Toward this purpose, we performed an online search on PubMed using the term "bladder cancer” in combination with “meat”, “red meat”, “white meat” or “processed meat”. Although some studies did not report any association between BC and meat intake, several reports highlighted a positive correlation between red or processed meat intake, especially salami, pastrami, corned beef and bacon, and BC risk. We speculate that a reduction or rather a weighting of the consumption of red and processed meat can reduce the risk of developing BC. Obviously, this remark claims future indications regarding food education (type of meat to be preferred, quantity of red meat to be eaten and how to cook it) to reduce the risk of developing BC. Further well-designed prospective studies are needed to corroborate these findings.
2022
Bladder cancer; risk factor; food; incidence
01 Pubblicazione su rivista::01a Articolo in rivista
The impact of meat intake on bladder cancer incidence: is it really a relevant risk? / Aveta, Achille; Cacciapuoti, Crescenzo; Barone, Biagio; Di Di Zazzo, Erika; DEL GIUDICE, Francesco; Maggi, Martina; Ferro, Matteo; Terracciano, Daniela; Busetto, GIAN MARIA; Lucarelli, GIUSEPPE TIZIANO; Sabin Tataru, Octavian; Montanari, Emanuele; Fabio Mirto, Benito; Falcone, Alfonso; Giampaglia, Gaetano; Sicignano, Enrico; Capone, Federico Giovanni; Villano, Gianluca; Angellotto, Pasquale; Manfredi, Celeste; Napolitano, Luigi; Imbimbo, Ciro; Domenico Pandolfo, Savio; Crocetto, Felice. - In: CANCERS. - ISSN 2072-6694. - 14:19(2022), p. 4775. [10.3390/cancers14194775]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1655656
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