There is a deep interrelation between the thyroid gland and the kidney parenchyma, with dysfunction of the first leading to significant changes in renal metabolism and vice versa. Given the recognition of cancer as a systemic disease, the raise of thyroid tumors and the common association of several malignancies, such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and other, with an increased risk of kidney disease, public health alert for these conditions is warranted. A systematic review of the current evidence on the bidirectional relationship between thyroid and renal cancers was conducted including 18 studies, highlighting patient’s characteristics, histology, time for secondary malignancy to develop from the first diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. A total of 776 patients were identified; median age was 64 years (range: 7–76 years). Obesity and family history were identified as the most common risk factors, and genetic susceptibility was suggested with a potential strong association with Cowden syndrome. Controversy on chemo and radiotherapy effects was found, as not all patients were previously exposed to these treatments. Men were more likely to develop kidney cancer after a primary thyroid malignancy, with 423/776 (54%) experiencing renal disease secondarily. Median time after the first malignancy was 5.2 years (range: 0–20 years). With the advancement of current oncological therapy, the prognosis for thyroid cancer patients has improved, although there has been a corresponding rise in the incidence of multiple secondary malignancy within the same population, particularly concerning the kidney. Surgery can achieve disease-free survival, if surveillance follow-up allows for an early localized form, where radical treatment is recommended.

Thyroid and renal cancers: a bidirectional association / Bellini, Maria Irene; Lori, Eleonora; Forte, Flavio; Lauro, Augusto; Tripodi, Domenico; Amabile, Maria Ida; Cantisani, Vito; Varanese, Marzia; Ferent, Iulia Catalina; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; D’Andrea, Vito; Pironi, Daniele; Sorrenti, Salvatore. - In: FRONTIERS IN ONCOLOGY. - ISSN 2234-943X. - 12:(2022). [10.3389/fonc.2022.951976]

Thyroid and renal cancers: a bidirectional association

Bellini, Maria Irene
Co-primo
;
Lori, Eleonora
Co-primo
;
Forte, Flavio
Secondo
;
Lauro, Augusto;Tripodi, Domenico;Amabile, Maria Ida;Cantisani, Vito;Varanese, Marzia;Ferent, Iulia Catalina;Baldini, Enke;Ulisse, Salvatore;D’Andrea, Vito;Pironi, Daniele
Penultimo
;
Sorrenti, Salvatore
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

There is a deep interrelation between the thyroid gland and the kidney parenchyma, with dysfunction of the first leading to significant changes in renal metabolism and vice versa. Given the recognition of cancer as a systemic disease, the raise of thyroid tumors and the common association of several malignancies, such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and other, with an increased risk of kidney disease, public health alert for these conditions is warranted. A systematic review of the current evidence on the bidirectional relationship between thyroid and renal cancers was conducted including 18 studies, highlighting patient’s characteristics, histology, time for secondary malignancy to develop from the first diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. A total of 776 patients were identified; median age was 64 years (range: 7–76 years). Obesity and family history were identified as the most common risk factors, and genetic susceptibility was suggested with a potential strong association with Cowden syndrome. Controversy on chemo and radiotherapy effects was found, as not all patients were previously exposed to these treatments. Men were more likely to develop kidney cancer after a primary thyroid malignancy, with 423/776 (54%) experiencing renal disease secondarily. Median time after the first malignancy was 5.2 years (range: 0–20 years). With the advancement of current oncological therapy, the prognosis for thyroid cancer patients has improved, although there has been a corresponding rise in the incidence of multiple secondary malignancy within the same population, particularly concerning the kidney. Surgery can achieve disease-free survival, if surveillance follow-up allows for an early localized form, where radical treatment is recommended.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11573/1655261
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