Background: Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and has a major impact on their quality of life. Measurement tools that assess the patient’s condition are commonly used in the neurological field, though diagnostic tools are currently unable to distinguish potential alternative causes of fatigue in individual patients. The Revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS-R) is a self-administered assessment scale that is internationally used for fatigue measurement. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Italian version of the PFS-R in patients with MS. Methods: Forty-one individuals were included in this study. Each participant in the study was given a dossier, in paper format, containing the informed consent form, a personal data sheet, the Fatigue Symptoms and Impacts Questionnaire in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (FSIQ-RMS), the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and the PFS-R. Results: The PFS-R was found to have strong internal consistency, with a value of α equal to 0.977. Correlations between PFS-R, FSS, and FSIQ-RMS scores were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and all scales showed statistically significant correlations. Conclusion: The PFS-R is a new self-administered tool to assess fatigue in patients with MS. It evaluates fatigue characteristics, difficulty in carrying out daily life activities, and how the individual feels as a result of this symptom. This tool was previously validated for use in cancer patients, which also allows us to make a comparison between different pathologies and rehabilitation treatments.

Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

Anna Berardi
;
Gina Ferrazzano;Marco Tramontano;Giovanni Galeoto
2022

Abstract

Background: Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and has a major impact on their quality of life. Measurement tools that assess the patient’s condition are commonly used in the neurological field, though diagnostic tools are currently unable to distinguish potential alternative causes of fatigue in individual patients. The Revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS-R) is a self-administered assessment scale that is internationally used for fatigue measurement. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Italian version of the PFS-R in patients with MS. Methods: Forty-one individuals were included in this study. Each participant in the study was given a dossier, in paper format, containing the informed consent form, a personal data sheet, the Fatigue Symptoms and Impacts Questionnaire in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (FSIQ-RMS), the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and the PFS-R. Results: The PFS-R was found to have strong internal consistency, with a value of α equal to 0.977. Correlations between PFS-R, FSS, and FSIQ-RMS scores were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and all scales showed statistically significant correlations. Conclusion: The PFS-R is a new self-administered tool to assess fatigue in patients with MS. It evaluates fatigue characteristics, difficulty in carrying out daily life activities, and how the individual feels as a result of this symptom. This tool was previously validated for use in cancer patients, which also allows us to make a comparison between different pathologies and rehabilitation treatments.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1654896
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