Metal 3D-printed parts are critical in industries such as biomedical, surgery, and prosthetics to create tailored components for patients, but the costs associated with traditional metal additive manufacturing (AM) techniques are typically prohibitive. To overcome this disadvantage, more cost-effective manufacturing processes are needed, and a good approach is to combine fused deposition modeling (FDM) with debinding-sintering processes. Furthermore, optimizing the printing parameters is required to improve material density and mechanical performance. The design of experiment (DoE) technique was used to evaluate the impact of three printing factors, namely nozzle temperature, layer thickness, and flow rate, on the tensile and bending properties of sintered 316L stainless steel in this study. Green and sintered samples were morphologically and physically characterized after printing, and the optimal printing settings were determined by statistical analysis, which included the surface response technique. The mechanical properties of the specimens increased as the flow rate and layer thickness increased and the nozzle temperature decreased. The optimized printing parameters for the ranges used in this study include 110% flow rate, 140 mu m layer thickness, and 240 degrees C nozzle temperature, which resulted in sintered parts with a tensile strength of 513 MPa and an elongation at break of about 60%.

Fused Deposition Modeling Parameter Optimization for Cost-Effective Metal Part Printing

Tirillo', Jacopo;Sarasini, Fabrizio;Sergi, Claudia;
2022

Abstract

Metal 3D-printed parts are critical in industries such as biomedical, surgery, and prosthetics to create tailored components for patients, but the costs associated with traditional metal additive manufacturing (AM) techniques are typically prohibitive. To overcome this disadvantage, more cost-effective manufacturing processes are needed, and a good approach is to combine fused deposition modeling (FDM) with debinding-sintering processes. Furthermore, optimizing the printing parameters is required to improve material density and mechanical performance. The design of experiment (DoE) technique was used to evaluate the impact of three printing factors, namely nozzle temperature, layer thickness, and flow rate, on the tensile and bending properties of sintered 316L stainless steel in this study. Green and sintered samples were morphologically and physically characterized after printing, and the optimal printing settings were determined by statistical analysis, which included the surface response technique. The mechanical properties of the specimens increased as the flow rate and layer thickness increased and the nozzle temperature decreased. The optimized printing parameters for the ranges used in this study include 110% flow rate, 140 mu m layer thickness, and 240 degrees C nozzle temperature, which resulted in sintered parts with a tensile strength of 513 MPa and an elongation at break of about 60%.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11573/1654421
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